Communication

Degree Programs Offered

COMM 8010  SEMINAR IN COMMUNICATION RESEARCH: QUANTITATIVE EMPHASIS (3 credits)

Philosophy of scientific investigation from a quantitative standpoint, including process and products, in comparison to other ways of knowing. Introduces students to quantitative designs and statistical applications for communication research and to data gathering methods appropriate for such designs. Emphasis is placed on preparing, evaluating and writing quantitatively oriented communication research proposals and reports.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate majoring in communication or permission of instructor.

COMM 8020  SEMINAR IN COMMUNICATION RESEARCH: QUALITATIVE EMPHASIS (3 credits)

This course is an introduction to the methodology and practice of qualitative research. Within the course, students will be exposed to research paradigms, approaches to qualitative research, and ways to collect and analyze qualitative data. Students will be required to design and carry out their own qualitative research project.

COMM 8030  TOPICS IN COMMUNICATION METHODS (1-6 credits)

This variable-content course provides students with in-depth knowledge about such topics as communication research methods (e.g., survey or experimental, content analysis, legal)or other communication methods and assessment in contexts such as instructional, health, media, interpersonal, or organizational.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate standing or permission of instructor. Graduate non-degree students not allowed.

COMM 8110  SEMINAR IN MODERN PUBLIC ADDRESS (3 credits)

Studies in figures, movements and institutions prominent in modern public address.

COMM 8180  TOPICS IN SPEECH COMMUNICATION (3 credits)

A variable content course dealing with speech communication. Each offering will treat a single aspect of speech communication in-depth - e.g., interpersonal conflict, gender and communication, organizational culture, health systems communication, relational communication, political communication, marital and family communication, communication education, etc. Course may be repeated.

COMM 8200  SEMINAR IN POPULAR CULTURE, MASS MEDIA AND VISUAL RHETORIC (3 credits)

This course studies how discursive meaning is made through established and emerging visual technologies and the impact visual symbol systems are having upon the field of rhetoric in general. Students will investigate how visual technologies, discourse theory, and semiotic theory has intersected with and expanded contemporary rhetorical theories, and they will apply these theories to visual texts. (Cross-listed with ENGL8760)

COMM 8300  TOPICAL SEMINAR MASS MEDIA (3 credits)

Substantive study of specialized areas and modes of broadcasting, film and print communication. Content will vary. Course may be repeated.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate and majoring in communication or permission of instructor.

COMM 8436  GLOBAL MEDIA COMMUNICATION (3 credits)

In-depth study of global media communication systems. This course will examine cultural influence of dominant global media, the changing global media climates, information flow, regulation and censorship of media worldwide. Students will look at the various aspects of mass communication including advertising, public relations, broadcasting, movies and social media. There will be an emphasis on global communication theories and on critical examinations of media systems. (Cross-listed with JMC 4430)

COMM 8470  FOUNDATIONS SEMINAR: COMMUNICATION STUDIES (3 credits)

This course is part of the Communication graduate degree core coursework. The course exposes students to the structure and historical development of the Communication Studies discipline. It also addresses issues involved in conceptualizing, evaluating, and doing research in Communication Studies from post-positive, interpretive, and critical perspectives. Additionally, the course examines Communication Studies in selected contexts and sub-disciplines. Finally, current and future directions in the development of the Communication Studies discipline are addressed.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Communication graduate students admitted to program; others may enroll only with instructor permission

COMM 8500  SEMINAR IN COMMUNICATION THEORY (3 credits)

This course has a twofold purpose: (1) to expose students to different perspectives on building and critiquing theory ( e.g., the classical versus the interpretive naturalistic perspectives.) (2) to apply perspectives to the analysis and critique of a range of influential theoretical approaches employed in the communication discipline (e.g., systems theory, semiotics, message reception/processing theories).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate and majoring in communication, or permission of instructor.

COMM 8570  FOUNDATIONS OF MASS COMMUNICATION (3 credits)

This course is part of the Communication graduate degree core coursework. This course presents a broad-based historical, theoretical, and methodological introduction to Mass Communication research and interconnection with Communication Studies. Course content moves from the initial, early 20th century research through contemporary studies and critique.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Communication graduate students admitted to program; others may enroll only with instructor permission. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

COMM 8970  GRADUATE PROJECT (3 credits)

Project Option students must complete a three-hour graduate project written under the supervision of an adviser. A two-member graduate committee must approve the project.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): COMM 8010, 8020, 8470, 8570 and student must be admitted to candidacy.

COMM 8980  INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3 credits)

Students conduct independent research under the supervision of an adviser. May be taken multiple times with approval of graduate adviser.

COMM 8990  THESIS (1-6 credits)

Independent research project written under the supervision of an adviser.

COMM 9400  SEMINAR IN COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGY (3 credits)

A synthesis of speech and mass communication research as it relates to the study of computers and technology. Computer Mediated Communication (CMC) will be emphasized. Students write a research paper appropriate for submission to an academic conference. (Cross-listed with ISQA 9900)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): COMM 8470 or 8570, and COMM 8010 or 8020, or permission of instructor.

CMST 8116  RHETORICAL THEORY AND CRITICISM (3 credits)

Rhetorical theory and criticism, emphasizing ways of evaluating oral communication. (Cross-listed with CMST 4110)

CMST 8126  COMMUNICATION AND SOCIAL PROTEST (3 credits)

This class will examine the role played by communication in movements for social change in contemporary society. We will examine social movements which rely on speeches (i.e. women¿s rights movements), social movements which rely on the grassroots political efforts of their members (i.e. the environmental rights movement) and the overall strategies of persuasion utilized in movements which seek social change, including emerging communication technologies. (Cross-listed with CMST 4120)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Non-degree or admission to School of Communication M.A. program.

CMST 8136  FAMILY COMMUNICATION (3 credits)

This course emphasizes the role of communication in family relationships. Theories, models, and research methods will be used to examine the family in various cultures and contexts (e.g., nuclear families, single-parent families, and blended families). Topics that will be covered in this course include: family conflict, family roles, family stories, family stress, family well-being, genograms, marriage, and divorce. (Cross-listed with CMST 4130)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate majoring in the School of Communication or permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

CMST 8146  COMMUNICATION AND HUMAN RELATIONSHIPS (3 credits)

This course applies theories of interpersonal processes and communication principles to the study of close, significant and personal human relationships. Discussion focuses on the communication in different types of relationships and relational stages, e.g., strangers, acquaintances, friendships and intimates. (Cross-listed with CMST 4140)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate Standing. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

CMST 8156  CORPORATE TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT (3 credits)

This course introduces students to the process of designing communication training programs and workshops for a variety of professional settings. It provides students, especially those who are prospective trainers and/or consultants, with experiential and cognitive knowledge about needs assessment, adult learning, communication training research, objectives writing, module design, interactive delivery methods and program evaluation. (Cross-listed with CMST 4150)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate standing. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

CMST 8166  COMMUNICATION FOR INSTRUCTIONAL SETTINGS (3 credits)

This course is designed to help prospective instructors and/or trainers understand and apply the principles of communication in instructional settings (i.e., classrooms, workshops, training programs). It introduces students to the research area in the speech communication discipline called 'Instructional Communication' by covering these five units: 1) Communication Strategies, Objectives, & Content; 2) Student Communication Needs & Expectations; 3) Feedback, Reinforcement, & Discussion; 4) Context, Climate, & Influence; and 5) Teacher Communicator Style, Characteristics, & Behaviors. (Cross-listed with CMST 4160)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate Standing.

CMST 8176  ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION (3 credits)

This course will help students understand organizational communication theories, models, and processes; apply these principles in organizational communication speaking exercises; and learn management and leadership skills. (Cross-listed with CMST 4170)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate Standing. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

CMST 8186  COMMUNICATION LEADERSHIP AND POWER AND ORGANIZATIONS (3 credits)

This course provides theoretical and experiential knowledge about such topics as communication leadership styles and tactics, superior and subordinate interactions, power, ethical responsibilities, and diversity gender issues related to communication leadership. (Cross-listed with CMST 4180)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate Standing. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

CMST 8196  COMPUTER-MEDIATED COMMUNICATION (3 credits)

Computer-Mediated Communication addressing emerging issues of virtual communities, identity, civic life and participation, online relationships, collaborative work environments, digital networks, gender race class issues, legal and ethical considerations of technology, and commodification of mediated communication. (Cross-listed with CMST 4190)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Admission into the graduate program

CMST 8226  HEALTH COMMUNICATION (3 credits)

This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of health communication. In this course, students will learn various theories of health communication as well as current research and trends in health communication and its related fields. To speak to the complexity and dynamism of health communication, this course will expose students to the multiple voices and perspectives involved in the delivery of health and healthcare. (Cross-listed with CMST 4220)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Junior standing; a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.25. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

CMST 8516  PERSUASION AND SOCIAL INFLUENCE (3 credits)

The primary goal of this course is to provide students with a solid grounding in theories, principles, and strategies of persuasion social influence as they apply to everyday contexts in which influence attempts take place. Students should gain familiarity with findings from empirical investigations on persuasion, social influence, and compliance gaining, and will learn about strategies and techniques of persuasion relating (Cross-listed with CMST 4510)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate standing. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

CMST 8526  PSYCHOLINGUISTICS (3 credits)

A discussion of the literature concerned with how such psychological variables as perception, learning, memory and development relate to the linguistic variables of sentence structure, meaning and speech sounds. (Cross-listed with CMST 4520)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Admission into graduate program. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

CMST 8536  INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION (3 credits)

This course will provide a foundation that leads to Intercultural Communication competence. Specifically, this course is to introduce the concepts of cross-cultural communication. Theory and research are integrated with application and necessary skills are identified and developed. (Cross-listed with CMST 4530)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Not open to non-degree graduate students.

CMST 8546  CONTEMPORARY SYSTEMS OF COMMUNICATION (3 credits)

An adaptation of General Systems Theory concepts to the study of human communication processes with emphasis on systems analysis of contemporary interpersonal communication perspectives. (Cross-listed with CMST 4540)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate standing and major in communication; or permission of instructor.

CMST 8556  NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION (3 credits)

This course is designed to familiarize the student with current knowledge and research about nonverbal communication and to provide a wide variety of practical experiences through which the student can analyze and evaluate his or her own nonverbal behavior and that of others. The course, also, reviews the functions, areas and applied contexts of nonverbal communication. (Cross-listed with CMST 4550)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate Standing. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

CMST 8566  COMMUNICATION, TEAMWORK, & FACILITATION (3 credits)

This course focuses on the communication practices, process tools, and theory associated with team problem solving, group discussion, facilitation skills, facilitative leadership, meeting management, and training in effective group interaction. (Cross-listed with CMST 4560)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate standing. Not open to nondegree students.

CMST 8576  INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION IN THE GLOBAL WORKPLACE (3 credits)

This course examines the intercultural perspective of organizational communication in a modern global world by focusing on the management of cultural differences in the global workplace. The trend towards a global economy is bringing people of different ethnic and cultural background together. Thus, the development of greater intercultural understanding has become an essential element of global workplace. After taking this course you will be more aware of cultural diversity in an organizational setting and further develop intercultural sensitivity and intercultural competence that will help you adapt to your future organizational life. (Cross-listed with CMST 4570)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate standing.

CMST 8586  COMMUNICATING RACE, ETHNICITY & IDENTITY (3 credits)

This is an undergraduate/graduate course that provides students with definitional and experiential knowledge about the origin of racial concepts, theories, and practices, definitions of ethnicity and identity, and the communicative relationship between race, ethnicity, and identity. (Cross-listed with CMST 4580, BLST 4580, BLST 8586)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate major/minor in Communication or Black Studies or instructor permission.

CMST 8606  COMMUNICATION THEORY AND APPLICATION (3 credits)

This course begins by introducing students to two broad categories of theory development - objective and interpretive. Then concepts and assumptions associated with each of these two perspectives are employed to critically evaluate several specific theories that fall within different of the sub-disciplines of the field of communication: interpersonal, group, organizational, mass, public/thetorical, cultural, and intercultural/gender. Along with critically evaluating and comparing/contrasting different communication theories, emphasis is placed on how the theories can be effectively applied in concrete settings and circumstances.(Cross-listed with CMST 4600)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate standing

CMST 8626  DIRECTING FORENSICS (3 credits)

To provide students planning to teach speech in high school or college with a philosophy and detailed knowledge of how to direct a forensic program. (Cross-listed with CMST 4620)

CMST 8706  INTERPERSONAL CONFLICT (3 credits)

This course provides an overview of interpersonal conflict processes. It examines perspectives on conflict, patterns of constructive and destructive conflict, conflict styles and tactics, interpersonal power, negotiation strategies, conflict assessment, and conflict skill development. (Cross-listed with CMST 4700)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Communication major

CMST 8806  CONFLICT MEDIATION (3 credits)

This course develops knowledge of mediation theory, research, and practice and communication skills essential to the effective mediation of disputes in various contexts. (Cross-listed with CMST 4800)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate major in Communication or Master of Business Administration (MBA) program, or instructor permission.

JMC 8016  HISTORY OF MASS COMMUNICATION (3 credits)

This class covers development of the U.S. media from 1690 to present day, including newspapers, magazines, radio, television, the new media of the Internet, advertising and public relations. A special emphasis is placed on freedom of the press. (Cross-listed with JMC 4010).

JMC 8046  SOCIAL MEDIA MEASUREMENT AND MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

Social Media Measurement and Management explores the dynamic development of social media platforms within a journalism and media communication context. Students of journalism, broadcasting, public relations, advertising and marketing will examine theories and best practices of social media interaction and engagement. (Cross-listed with JMC 4040).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Good standing as a UNO graduate student.

JMC 8226  LITERARY JOURNALISM (3 credits)

Survey of the journalistic works of pertinent American writers through readings, lectures, discussions, plus creative writing assignments. (Cross-listed with JMC 4220).

JMC 8235  PRINCIPLES OF PUBLIC RELATIONS (3 credits)

This course will focus primarily on techniques to garner and sustain public understanding, acceptance and support for an organization. This course will explain the merits of these techniques through theory and application, and will offer constant reminders of the relationship between theory and practice. Understanding theory can result in more efficient and effective use of techniques. (Cross-listed with JMC 3230).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): JMC 2100, JMC 2104 and minimum GPA of 2.25

JMC 8246  PUBLIC RELATIONS CASE STUDIES (3 credits)

The course is designed to enable the student: 1) to integrate issue-management and decision-making theoretical models with the communication theory and research techniques presented in JMC 4230/ JMC 8236 and 2) to apply professional judgement to the public relations problem-solving process through the development of structured analysis of historical cases. (Cross-listed with JMC 4240).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): JMC 2100 and JMC 2104; JMC 2200; JMC 2300; JMC 2370; and minimum cumulative GPA of 2.25. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

JMC 8266  MEDIA RELATIONS (3 credits)

This course focuses on the communication tools used in media relations, the nuances of working with reporters from press and various media, the application of communication theories in understanding the relationship between news organizations and media relations representatives for organizations and corporations. (Cross-listed with JMC 4260).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): JMC 3230 and minimum cumulative GPA of 2.25

JMC 8316  MEDIA & POLITICS (3 credits)

An in-depth study of the impact of the media on political communication. This course will explore the symbiotic relationship of media and political communication, including the influence of traditional mass media, digital media, and social media on the political communication process. Students will delve into media theories and critically examine the influence of the media on the political communication process. (Cross-listed with JMC 4310).

JMC 8346  MEDIA REGULATION & FREEDOM (3 credits)

Media and Internet regulation and free expression as defined and interpreted through First Amendment rights, prior restrain and obscenity case law, advertising and public relations, broadcast and cable TV regulation and deregulation policy, new telecommunication media, and privacy. (Cross-listed with JMC 4340).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ENGL1160

JMC 8376  COMMUNICATION WORKSHOP (3 credits)

A workshop to explore communication theory and processes and to develop skills in their application. (Cross-listed with JMC 4370).

JMC 8386  FILM THEORY AND CRITICISM (3 credits)

Study of major trends in film criticism and theory in Europe and America, with concentrated analysis of selected films. (Cross-listed with JMC 4380).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): JMC 1050/THEA 1050, ENGL 1160, and Junior standing. Minimum overall GPA of 2.25

JMC 8396  MEDIA ENTREPRENEURSHIP (3 credits)

4390 Media Entrepreneurship (3) explores new and emerging media business models from local, national and global perspectives. Students learn about and work within the start-up economy and entrepreneurial approaches. The course offers professional and critical perspectives. (Cross-listed with JMC 4390).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Minimum cumulative GPA- 2.25; Junior standing, ENGL 1160 or equivalent, or instructor permission.

JMC 8406  MASS MEDIA ETHICS (3 credits)

The course examines ethical standards and practices of the media - print, electronic and online media, as well as advertising, public relations and entertainment media. It includes development of ethical decision-making skills. (Cross-listed with JMC 4400).

JMC 8416  COMMUNICATION LAW AND POLICY (3 credits)

Communication practitioners need to understand legal protections and constraints. This course explores legal concepts, frameworks and principles to understand constitutional, statutory, regulatory and case law and policies. The student must have a basic understanding of government, social studies and human rights principles. The First Amendment and international law provide a framework for exploring current cases and issues. (Cross-listed with JMC 4410).

JMC 8426  SPORTS WRITING (3 credits)

Students will learn all aspects of the specialized aspect of sports media communication. Areas covered will include writing, interviewing, storytelling, using multiple media platforms and the ethics of sports reporting. Various writing experiences across the media spectrum, from traditional media to the new forms of online journalism, will be addressed. (Cross-listed with JMC 4420)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): JMC 2100 and JMC 2104; JMC 2200; JMC 2300; JMC 2370; and minimum cumulative GPA of 2.25. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

JMC 8506  MASS COMMUNICATION AND PUBLIC OPINION (3 credits)

This class represents a study of the philosophy, process and effects of mass communication; the relationship between the mass media and public opinion and propaganda; and the nature, function and measurement of public opinion.. (Cross-listed with JMC 4500).

JMC 8816  INFORMATION DESIGN FOR TECHNICAL COMMUNICATORS (3 credits)

This course addresses emerging issues about digital literacies such as the rhetoric of technology, technological competency, technology and information ecologies, critical awareness of technology and human interactions, judicious application of technological knowledge, user-centered design, networking and online communities, ethics and technology, and culture and technology. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4810, ENGL 8816, JMC 4810).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ENGL 1160 and CMST 1110

JMC 8826  POLITICS AND FILM (3 credits)

This course introduces students to the analysis of politics and film, focusing on how politics is portrayed in film and the politics of film making. (Cross-listed with PSCI 4820, JMC 4820, PSCI 8826).

JMC 8836  TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION (3 credits)

Technical Communication introduces students to the field of technical communication. Students will study the development of print and electronic genres common to industry settings, the design and production of technical documents, the writing processes and work practices of professional technical communicators, and the roles of technical communicators in organizational contexts. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4830, ENGL 8836, JMC 4830).

JMC 8856  INFORMATION DESIGN FOR TECHNICAL COMMUNICATORS (3 credits)

This course introduces students to strategies for integrating visual and textual elements of technical documents. Instruction will focus on design theory and application through individual and collaborative projects. Students will develop the professional judgement necessary for making and implementing stylistic choices appropriate for communicating technical information to a lay audience. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4850, ENGL 8856, JMC 4850).

JMC 8876  TECHNICAL EDITING (3 credits)

This course introduces students to the roles and responsibilities of technical editors: the editorial decision-making processes for genre, design, style, and production of technical information; the communication with technical experts, writers, and publishers; the collaborative processes of technical editing; and the techniques technical editors use during comprehensive, developmental, copyediting, and proofreading stages. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4870, ENGL 8876, JMC 4870).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ENGL 4830 or ENGL 3980, and ENGL 4850, or permission of instructor.

JMC 8896  CAPSTONE COURSE IN TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION (3 credits)

In this capstone course, students will extend foundational skills learned in previous technical communication courses. Students will demonstrate their competency of the technical documentation process in organizational environments, the issues important to the technical communication profession, and the practices of writing and creating complex technical documents for specific purpose and audience. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4890, ENGL 8896, JMC 4890).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): JMC 8816 and JMC 8836 and JMC 8856 and JMC 8876 highly recommended

JMC 8906  SEMINAR MASS COMMUNICATION (3 credits)

A senior seminar applying historical and theoretical perspective to current issues and developments in mass communications. (Cross-listed with JMC 4900)

JMC 8916  SEMINAR MASS COMMUNICATION (3 credits)

A senior seminar applying historical and theoretical perspective to current issues and developments in mass communications. (Cross-listed with JMC 4910)

JMC 8926  MEDIA LITERACY (3 credits)

An advanced seminar on the study of media and information literacy through deconstruction of mass communication content, meaning construction, framing analyses and critical/cultural approaches. (Cross-listed with JMC 4920).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Must be enrolled in the School of Communication program or receive permission of instructor.