English

Degree Programs Offered

ENGL 8010  SEMINAR: LITERARY RESEARCH (3 credits)

A survey of the resources, methodologies, and protocol for conducting and reporting the results of research appropriate to graduate-level study in English and its related disciplines.

ENGL 8020  SEMINAR: COLLEGE WRITING INSTRUCTION (5 credits)

The seminar in college writing instruction prepares Graduate Teaching Assistants to fulfill their responsibilities as teachers of first-year composition.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate status and a teaching assistantship. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

ENGL 8026  AMERICAN POETRY (3 credits)

The practice and theory of American poetry from the colonial period up to the contemporary period. Formerly ENGL 4930/8936. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4020).

ENGL 8030  FIELD-BASED RESEARCH METHODS IN ENGLISH STUDIES (3 credits)

An overview of resources and methods for conducting qualitative, field-based research in English and related disciplines; students gain experience collecting data and analyzing data and reporting findings.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Admission to the graduate program in English or permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

ENGL 8046  CONTEMPORARY POETRY OF ENGLAND AND AMERICA (3 credits)

A study of English and American poetry, the important ideas it contains, and the relevant critical theory of the contemporary period. Formerly ENGL 4910/8916. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4040).

ENGL 8066  THE AMERICAN NOVEL (3 credits)

A comprehensive survey of the evolution of the American Novel from 1789 to the present day. Special emphasis will be placed on how authors have responded to changing cultural circumstances and expressed widely varying viewpoints depending on their own gender, race, geographic region, and/or ethnicity. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4060).

ENGL 8100  SEMINAR: TOPICS IN AMERICAN LITERATURE (3 credits)

Individual research and group discussion relating to a general topic in American literature. (The course may be repeated for additional credits under different topics.) Formerly ENGL 8060.

ENGL 8146  AMERICAN LITERARY REALISM AND NATURALISM (3 credits)

This course examines a wide range of 19th- and 20th-century American literary works, written by male and female authors of various races, geographic regions, and ethnicities. The influence of cultural, economic, political, and social environments on the construction and reception of these works will be emphasized. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4140).

ENGL 8160  SEMINAR: POSTMODERN FICTION OF THE UNITED STATES (3 credits)

A seminar in American Fiction from the second half of the twentieth century into the twenty-first century which presents and discusses some of the major trends and issues associated with postmodern culture in America.

ENGL 8166  TOPICS IN AMERICAN REGIONALISM (3 credits)

A study of major trends in American literary regionalism, with special emphasis on social, cultural, and ecological contexts. Focus will be determined by instructor, but may include particular authors, literary themes, historical periods, or geographic regions. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4160).

ENGL 8180  SEMINAR: CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN POETRY (3 credits)

A study of the work of selected contemporary American poets, especially the technical aspects of the poetry. Texts usually will be a full single volume by each poet or in some cases the selected or collected works of a poet. Formerly ENGL 8920.

ENGL 8186  MAJOR MOVEMENTS IN CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE (3 credits)

A critical study of selected major literary figures or major literary movements which have appeared since World War II. Formerly ENGL 4950/8956 Contemporary Literature: Major Figures and Major Movements. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4180).

ENGL 8200  SEMINAR: MIDDLE ENGLISH LITERATURE (3 credits)

A study of selected writings in Middle English.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate and one course in Middle English language or writings.

ENGL 8236  LATINO LITERATURE (3 credits)

A study of representative works of Mexican-American, Spanish-American, and American writers, along with their cultural and historical antecedents. Formerly ENGL 4180/8186 Chicano Literature and Culture. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4230)).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate, permission.

ENGL 8246  TEACHING LATINO LITERATURE (3 credits)

This course is designed specifically for current or future teachers of high school students. It introduces pedagogical approaches of contemporary literature by Latinos/as in the United States. The course provides an overview of Mexican American, Chicano/a, and other Latino/a voices in American literature from mid-19th Century to the present and complement that with social, cultural, historical and other approaches to developing teaching strategies. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4240)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ENGL 1160 or permission

ENGL 8250  SEMINAR: CHAUCER (3 credits)

A study of selected works of Geoffrey Chaucer.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate and one course in Middle English language or writings.

ENGL 8256  INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN'S STUDIES IN LITERATURE (3 credits)

A critical study of literature by and about women in which students learn about contributions of women to literature, ask what literature reveals about the identity and roles of women in various contexts, and evaluate standard interpretations from the perspectives of current research and individual experience. (Cross-listed with ENGL 2450).

ENGL 8266  WOMEN OF COLOR WRITERS (3 credits)

Women of Color Writers is designed to introduce students to the multicultural, literary experience and contributions of women of color writers. The course will elucidate the multi-ethnic and feminist/womanist perspectives reflected in literary works by examining the themes, motifs and idioms used to portray women. The course examines critically the implications and conceptual grounds of literary study which have been based almost entirely on male literary experiences. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4260).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate English major or permission of instructor.

ENGL 8276  WOMEN WRITERS OF THE WEST (3 credits)

A survey of American and Canadian women writers who explore issues of settlement, land use, cultural displacement, and survival in western territories, states, and provinces. Readings span 19th and 20th-Century literacy and reflect the cultural diversity of the American and Canadian wests. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4270 and WGST 4270).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ENGL 1150 and ENGL 1160 or equivalent; ENGL 2410 recommended.

ENGL 8300  SEMINAR: SHAKESPEARE (3 credits)

Critical analysis of ten tragedies, ten histories, or ten comedies of Shakespeare. Formerly ENGL 9120.

ENGL 8310  ECOLOGICAL WRITING AND ANALYSIS (3 credits)

This course provides students with the opportunity to develop expertise in a wide range of foundational works and key techniques of ecological writing and theory in English. By engaging mindfully with these works and techniques, students will develop advanced skills in ecologically oriented critical analysis and creative thinking. This course supports the Writing and Critical Reflection and the Health and the Environment concentrations in the Master of Arts in Critical and Creative Thinking. (Cross-listed with CACT 8310)

ENGL 8316  MIDDLE ENGLISH LITERATURE (3 credits)

A survey of the principal writings in English, excluding those of Chaucer, from 1100 to 1500. Formerly ENGL 4320/8326. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4310).

ENGL 8326  CHAUCER (3 credits)

A literary, linguistic, and historical study of the works of Geoffrey Chaucer: his dream visions, Troilus and Criseyde, and the Canterbury Tales. Formerly ENGL 4340/8346. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4320).

ENGL 8346  SHAKESPEARE (3 credits)

A critical study of selected plays from among the four traditional Shakespearean genres: comedy, history, tragedy, and romance. Formerly ENGL 4600/8606. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4340).

ENGL 8356  SHAKESPEARE'S CONTEMPORARIES (3 credits)

A study of the development of the English drama, exclusive of Shakespeare, from the beginning to 1642. Formerly ENGL 4500/8506. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4350).

ENGL 8376  RESTORATION AND 18TH CENTURY LITERATURE (3 credits)

Poetry, prose (exclusive of the novel), and drama of England in the Restoration and 18th century (1660-1800), with emphasis on Swift and Johnson. Formerly ENGL 4620/8626. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4370).

ENGL 8396  MEDIEVAL CELTIC LITERATURE (3 credits)

This course examines the literature and culture of the Celtic civilizations. The course examines the archeological record and texts about the Celts by Greek and Roman authors, as well as later medieval tales from the Irish, Welsh, and Breton traditions. All texts are in translation with guided reference to the original languages. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4390).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ENGL 2410 or ENGL 2420 and one ENGL course above 3299, or instructor permission; ENGL 2310 recommended. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

ENGL 8400  SEMINAR: ENGLISH RENAISSANCE (3 credits)

A seminar in a few significant literary figures of the English Renaissance. Formerly ENGL 8080.

ENGL 8410  IMMIGRATION, MIGRATION, AND DIASPORA: CRITICAL APPROACHES AND THEORIES OF MOVEMENT IN LITERATURE (3 credits)

This seminar in literature and some film analyzes the depictions in non-fiction and fiction of displacement as a result of immigration, migration, refugee status, or any other considered movement, intentional or imposed. It will focus largely on the U.S. experiences of those displaced from all locales. (Cross-listed with CACT 8410).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate standing.

ENGL 8416  LITERATURE OF THE ROMANTIC PERIOD (3 credits)

Poetry and prose (excluding the novel) of England from 1798 to 1830. Formerly ENGL 4810/8816. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4410).

ENGL 8426  LITERATURE OF VICTORIAN PERIOD (3 credits)

English poetry and prose (excluding the novel) from 1830 to 1900. Formerly ENGL 4820/8826. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4420).

ENGL 8436  THE 19TH CENTURY ENGLISH NOVEL (3 credits)

Readings in the English novel from Jane Austen to Thomas Hardy. Formerly: ENGL 4650/8656. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4430).

ENGL 8450  SEMINAR: JOHN MILTON (3 credits)

Intensive seminar in the major works of John Milton and investigation of specific critical and scholarly problems. Formerly ENGL 8140.

ENGL 8486  20TH CENTURY ENGLISH LITERATURE (3 credits)

Readings in English literature from Shaw and Yeats to the present. Formerly ENGL 4850/8856. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4480).

ENGL 8500  SEMINAR: RESTORATION AND 18TH CENTURY (3 credits)

A detailed study of selected English authors and works of the Restoration and the 18th century (1660-1800). Formerly ENGL 8090.

ENGL 8600  SEMINAR: 19TH CENTURY ENGLISH LITERATURE (3 credits)

An intensive study of selected Victorian authors and their works. Formerly ENGL 8100.

ENGL 8610  PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL WRITING (3 credits)

This course will introduce students to the theory, research, and practices of professional and technical writing. Through readings, discussions, and assignments, students will gain an understanding of the types and circumstances of communication challenges encountered in the workplace. The course will also consider the roles of persuasion and ethics in written communication. (Cross-listed with CACT 8610).

ENGL 8615  INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS (3 credits)

An introduction to the concepts and methodology of the scientific study of language; includes language description, history, theory, variation, and semantics as well as first and second language acquisition. Formerly ENGL 8616. (Cross-listed with ENGL 3610).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ENGL 1160 or equivalent

ENGL 8620  SEMINAR: JANE AUSTEN (3 credits)

This seminar examines Jane Austen's oeuvre from her juvenilia to her posthumous fragments, giving particular emphasis to her six great novels, Northanger Abbey, Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Emma, and Persuasion. Austen biography and scholarship provide the framework for studying her literary career.

ENGL 8626  HISTORY OF ENGLISH (3 credits)

A critical study of both the internal and external histories of English. Includes historical development of English phonology, morphology, graphics, syntax, diction, dialects, and semantics. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4620).

ENGL 8630  DIGITAL RHETORIC (3 credits)

This course provides students with the opportunity to develop expertise in the theory and practice of digital rhetoric by considering technology's deep impact on how we define and engage in writing. Students examine contemporary writing practices as part of a rich rhetorical tradition while they design and create effective multimodal compositions and analyze foundational works in digital rhetoric. This course supports the Writing and Critical Reflection concentration in the Master of Arts in Critical and Creative Thinking. (Cross-listed with CACT 8630).

ENGL 8640  CREATIVE NONFICTION IN DIGITAL ENVIRONMENTS (3 credits)

Students in this course will study creative nonfiction in digital environments, analyze rhetorical situations created in digital environments, and create individual creative nonfiction blogs-which might include, in addition to other modalities, sounds, animations, and hypertext. The course will also focus on the study and analysis of craft-elements of creative nonfiction: narrative persona, tone, rhythm and style, scenic construction, among others. Students taking this course will learn to read with interpretative and analytical proficiency a broad range of creative nonfiction in digital environments. Cross-listed with CACT 8640).

ENGL 8646  APPLIED LINGUISTICS (3 credits)

This course is designed to develop knowledge and skills for second language instructors and others interested in second language learning and instruction. Content covers relevant second language acquisition (SLA) theory and second language pedagogy. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4640)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ENGL 3610 and Junior standing or with permission from instructor.

ENGL 8650  WRITING ACROSS DIFFERENCES: RHETORICAL THEORY FOR PERSUASION AND PUBLIC ADVOCACY (3 credits)

This course provides students a theoretical foundation for understanding how language is used in various types of discourses and texts as a means of convincing others of a given viewpoint or idea. Students will apply this theory to real-world writing scenarios in their scholarly areas of interest, to advocacy and social issues movements, or to address workplace needs and goals. This course supports the Writing and Critical Reflection concentration in the Master of Arts in Critical and Creative Thinking. (Cross-listed with CACT 8650).

ENGL 8656  STRUCTURE OF ENGLISH (3 credits)

A study of grammar as it has been conceived through history, including traditional prescriptive and descriptive approaches as well as transformational- generative grammar. Formerly ENGL 4780/8786. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4650).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ENGL 4610/ENGL 8616, or permission.

ENGL 8676  SOCIOLINGUISTICS (3 credits)

An exploration of interconnections between language, culture, and communicative meaning, stressing interactional, situational, and social functions of language as they take place and are created within social contexts. Formerly ENGL 4880/8886. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4670).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ENGL 4610/ENGL 8616, or permission.

ENGL 8696  TOPICS IN LINGUISTICS (3 credits)

Studies in a selected subfield or problem area of linguistics such as sociolinguistics, generative semantics, applied linguistics, descriptive linguistics, teaching English as a foreign language, etc. Formerly ENGL 4960/8966. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4690).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ENGL 4610/ENGL 8616, or permission.

ENGL 8736  RHETORIC (3 credits)

A study of contemporary theories of invention, form, and style and their application in written discourse. Formerly ENGL 4530/8536. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4730).

ENGL 8740  SEMINAR: DISCOURSE, CULTURE, AND POWER (3 credits)

A graduate-level introduction to theories and methodologies of analyzing spoken and written discourse. This seminar will prepare students to conduct field research and analyze natural language data based on theoretical orientations to discourse analysis.

ENGL 8750  OXBOW WRITING PROJECT (3 credits)

Oxbow Writing Project summer institute immerses K-16 educators in writing pedagogy via their own writing, presentations about writing and pedagogy, reading and discussing professional literature, designing and implementing an in-depth inquiry project, and developing leadership strengths. Oxbow is a National Writing Project Site.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Acceptance into Oxbow Writing Project Summer Institute

ENGL 8756  COMPOSITION THEORY & PEDAGOGY (3 credits)

Students will review and evaluate 20th century theories with an emphasis on theories developed since 1968. Students will investigate current research practices and design and execute their own research projects. Formerly ENGL 4760/8766. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4750).

ENGL 8760  SEMINAR IN POPULAR CULTURE, MASS MEDIA AND VISUAL RHETORIC (3 credits)

This course studies how discursive meaning is made through established and emerging visual technologies and the impact visual symbol systems are having upon the field of rhetoric in general. Students will investigate how visual technologies, discourse theory, and semiotic theory has intersected with and expanded contemporary rhetorical theories, and they will apply these theories to visual texts. (Cross-listed with COMM 8200).

ENGL 8775  WRITING CENTER THEORY, PEDAGOGY, AND RESEARCH (3 credits)

This course is an introduction to writing center theory, pedagogy, research, and history. The course is designed for undergraduate and graduate students interested in or already working in a writing center. Throughout the course we will explore a wide range of models for writing center work and the often problematic metaphors associated with those models. The overall aim in this course will be to help students develop multiple strategies for teaching writing one-to-one, for conducting research in writing centers, and for understanding writing center administration. (Cross-listed with ENGL 3770).

ENGL 8780  PEDAGOGIC FIELD EXPERIENCE IN TESOL (3 credits)

A semester of observation and participation in a service-learning and/or classroom situation in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL). The course will emphasize the orchestration of the learning environment in a multicultural and global society.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate Standing and TED 4000 / TED 8006

ENGL 8796  ENGLISH CAREER PREPARATION (1 credit)

This course will prepare students for an internship or a career, addressing topics such as finding and applying for internships, workplace and industry, resume and cover letters, interviewing techniques, developing a professional portfolio, and statement of goals. Taking this course prior to an internship is highly recommended. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4790).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate standing or permission of instructor.

ENGL 8800  SEMINAR: TOPICS IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE (3 credits)

An intensive study of one or more authors, genres, literary movements, or literary problems not covered by regular period or genre courses. (This course may be repeated for additional credits under different topics.) Formerly ENGL 8130.

ENGL 8806  ENGLISH INTERNSHIP (1-3 credits)

Supervised internship in a professional setting with a local employer or nonprofit organization. Hands-on experience. Work hours, activities, and responsibilities must be specified in a written agreement between the employer and the student in consultation with the internship director. Some internships will be paid and some will not. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4800).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ENGL 2410 or ENGL 2420, an ENGL 4000-level writing course, and permission of internship director.

ENGL 8816  DIGITAL LITERACIES FOR TECHNICAL COMMUNICATORS (3 credits)

This course addresses emerging issues about digital literacies such as the rhetoric of technology, technological competency, technology and information ecologies, critical awareness of technology and human interactions, judicious application of technological knowledge, user-centered design, networking and online communities, ethics and technology, and culture and technology. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4810).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ENGL 1160 and CMST 1110, or permission of instructor.

ENGL 8826  AUTOBIOGRAPHY (3 credits)

Students will read as well as write autobiography. Students will read texts representing various social, political, and religious points of view. Students will also study these texts for theoretical principles and autobiographical techniques which they will use to inform their own autobiographical essays. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4820).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ENGL 2450 or ENGL 2460

ENGL 8836  TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION (3 credits)

Technical Communication introduces students to the field of technical communication. Students will study the development of print and electronic genres common to industry settings, the design and production of technical documents, the writing processes and work practices of professional technical communicators, and the roles of technical communicators in organizational contexts. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4830, JMC 4830, JMC 8836).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate standing or permission of instructor.

ENGL 8846  TRAVEL WRITING (3 credits)

Travel Writing is a course in professional writing. Although the course includes critical examinations of texts, the primary focus is on the composition of various kinds of travel essays. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4840, JMC 4840, JMC 8846).

ENGL 8850  SEM: SPIRITUAL NONFICTION (3 credits)

Spiritual Nonfiction is a creative nonfiction writing seminar where students study and practice various forms and styles of spiritual nonfiction. The comparative study of spirituality and religion is not the focus of this course. Writing is the focus. Discussion of the characteristics of spiritual experiences and ideas will be limited to their formalistic treatment within individual works.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate Standing. At least one creative nonfiction writing course at 4000/8000 level.

ENGL 8856  INFORMATION DESIGN FOR TECHNICAL COMMUNICATORS (3 credits)

This course introduces students to strategies for integrating visual and textual elements of technical documents. Instruction will focus on design theory and application through individual and collaborative projects. Students will develop the professional judgment necessary for making and implementing stylistic choices appropriate for communicating technical information to a lay audience. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4850, JMC 4850, JMC 8856).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate standing or permission of instructor.

ENGL 8866  THE MODERN FAMILIAR ESSAY (3 credits)

A study of the modern familiar essay, with an emphasis on writing the informal essay. Formerly ENGL 4700/8706. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4860).

ENGL 8870  SEMINAR: PUBLISHING NON-FICTION (3 credits)

A seminar in the process leading to publication of essays in one or more of the following genres: scholarly essay, personal essay, travel essay, pedagogical essay, autobiographical essay.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate standing and 6 hours of graduate credit.

ENGL 8876  TECHNICAL EDITING (3 credits)

This course introduces students to the roles and responsibilities of technical editors: the editorial decision-making processes for genre, design, style, and production of technical information; the communication with technical experts, writers, and publishers; the collaborative processes of technical editing; and the techniques technical editors use during comprehensive, developmental, copyediting, and proofreading stages. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4870, JMC 4870, JMC 8876).

ENGL 8880  ADVANCED PLACEMENT INSTITUTE: ENGLISH & COMPOSITIONS (3 credits)

An intensive workshop devoted to the organization, planning, implementation and improvement of advanced placement courses in literature and composition. Intended for secondary school teachers of English who are presently teaching or are planning to propose and/or teach advanced placement courses in their school.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate in English.

ENGL 8886  COMMUNITY SERVICE WRITING (3 credits)

A study of the relationship between texts and the social contexts in which they function, with particular attention to differences between academic and non-academic discourse communities. This is a service-learning course: students work as volunteers at community organizations. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4880).

ENGL 8890  SEM: EXPERIMENTS IN CREATIVE NONFICTION (3 credits)

This is a graduate seminar in creative nonfiction. This course explores, through an intensive engagement with long and short forms of creative nonfiction, the ways in which contemporary practitioners of the genre have experimented with form and meaning. Students will attempt their own experiments in writing.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate Standing, Two graduate-level creative nonfiction courses from ENGL 8846, ENGL 8866, ENGL 8870, or ENGL 8800, when topic is appropriate.

ENGL 8896  CAPSTONE COURSE IN TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION (3 credits)

In this capstone course, students will extend foundational skills learned in previous technical communication courses. Students will demonstrate their competency of the technical documentation process in organizational environments, the issues important to the technical communication profession, and the practices of writing and creating complex technical documents for specific purpose and audience.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate standing or permission of instructor. ENGL 8816, ENGL 8836, ENGL 8856 and ENGL 8876 highly recommended.

ENGL 8900  INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3 credits)

Specially planned readings in a well-defined field of literature or language, carried out under the supervision of a member of the graduate faculty. Designed primarily for the student who has need of work not currently available in the departmental offering and who has demonstrated capability of working independently. May be repeated for credit once. Formerly ENGL 8980.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate, permission of instructor, and no "incompletes" outstanding.

ENGL 8910  SEMINAR: CRITICAL THEORY (3 credits)

Seminar in theories of literary criticism, with emphasis on modern approaches. Formerly ENGL 8040.

ENGL 8926  GREAT CHARACTERS (3 credits)

Great Characters is a study of literary characters in fiction and drama from the standpoint of temperament theory. The course uses Keirsey's model of temperament to focus on conflict and conflict resolution between characters as this constitutes the dynamics of plot. Formerly ENGL 4050/8056. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4920).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): One 4000 level English course.

ENGL 8966  TOPICS IN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE (3 credits)

Specific subjects (when offered) appear in class schedules. Complete syllabus available in English Department. Formerly ENGL 4940/8946. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4960).

ENGL 8990  THESIS (3-6 credits)

Independent research project written under the supervision of an adviser.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate, permission of thesis director.