English, MA

Department of English, College of Arts & Sciences

Vision Statement

The English Department reflects the centrality of language to human endeavors and its effectiveness in achieving awareness of the human complexities that are part of us, our relationships, and our roles in the world.

Program Contact Information

Dr.  Ramón Guerra, Graduate Program Chair (GPC) 
Arts & Science Hall (ASH) 192D
402-554-2096
rguerra@unomaha.edu

Program Website

Admissions

Application Deadlines

Applications for this program are accepted on a rolling basis. All materials must be submitted prior to the beginning of the semester in which the student has elected to begin coursework.

Program-Specific Requirements

  • International student applicants score at least 600 on the paper-based TOEFL examination, 250 on the computer-based TOEFL, 100 on the internet-based TOEFL, 8 IELTS, or 68 PTE in order to be eligible for unconditional admission.
  • Statement of Purpose
    • The statement (of about 500-1000 words) should convey the applicant’s previous study in the field of English, any relevant work or life experience, the applicant’s philosophy of learning and reason for pursuing a Master’s degree in English, and anything else that might help convey the applicant’s personality, spirit, or intellectual character.
  • To be admitted to graduate study in English, a student should have completed at least 18 credit hours in undergraduate English courses above the freshman level with an average grade of “B” (3.0 on a 4.0 scale) or higher.

Teaching Assistantship

The application for a graduate assistantship requires the following additional materials, which should all be sent directly to Dr. Ramón Guerra, Graduate Program Chair, Department of English, ASH 192D, University of Nebraska at Omaha, 6001 Dodge St., Omaha, NE 68182-0175.

  • Application coversheet (available online)
  • Statement of Purpose: 500-1000 words detailing the applicant’s ambitions in the graduate program and his or her motivation for pursuing an assistantship. In addition, this statement should convey some sense of the applicant’s identity and philosophy of learning.
  • Writing Sample or Samples of academic or creative non-fiction prose by the applicant totaling 10-20 pages in length. The sample(s) should reflect the applicant's best writing, demonstrating a cohesive argument and/or sustained thematic focus and excellent control of syntax and style.
  • Three Letters of Recommendation from past teachers or anyone else reasonably able to offer an objective assessment of the applicant’s writing, critical reasoning skills, and promise as a teacher. These letters should be sent to the above address directly by the recommenders, along with waiver forms.
  • Either Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores or Miller Analogies Test (MAT) scores sent directly to UNO from the testing entities.

Degree Requirements

Option 1: Thesis

(24 hours of coursework; 6 hours of thesis)

  • For this option at least 12 hours of coursework must be seminar-level.
Required Courses for both Thesis and Non-Thesis Options
ENGL 8010SEMINAR: LITERARY RESEARCH3
ENGL 8030FIELD-BASED RESEARCH METHODS IN ENGLISH STUDIES3
Electives
Select 12 hours for the Thesis Option, 6 hours of which must be seminars (see below).18
Thesis Requirement
ENGL 8990THESIS6
Total Credits30

Option 2: Non-Thesis

(36 hours of coursework)

  • For this option at least 18 hours of coursework must be seminar-level.
Required Courses for both Thesis and Non-Thesis Options
ENGL 8010SEMINAR: LITERARY RESEARCH3
ENGL 8030FIELD-BASED RESEARCH METHODS IN ENGLISH STUDIES3
Electives
Select 30 hours for the Non-Thesis Option, 18 hours of which must be seminars. Seminars end in a zero (0) (see below).30
Total Credits36

Elective Course List for Both Thesis and Non-Thesis Options

ENGL 8046CONTEMPORARY POETRY OF ENGLAND AND AMERICA3
ENGL 8066THE AMERICAN NOVEL3
ENGL 8100SEMINAR: TOPICS IN AMERICAN LITERATURE3
ENGL 8146AMERICAN LITERARY REALISM AND NATURALISM3
ENGL 8160SEMINAR: POSTMODERN FICTION OF THE UNITED STATES3
ENGL 8166TOPICS IN AMERICAN REGIONALISM3
ENGL 8180SEMINAR: CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN POETRY3
ENGL 8186MAJOR MOVEMENTS IN CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE3
ENGL 8200SEMINAR: MIDDLE ENGLISH LITERATURE3
ENGL 8236LATINO LITERATURE3
ENGL 8246TEACHING LATINO LITERATURE3
ENGL 8250SEMINAR: CHAUCER3
ENGL 8256INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN'S STUDIES IN LITERATURE3
ENGL 8266WOMEN OF COLOR WRITERS3
ENGL 8276WOMEN WRITERS OF THE WEST3
ENGL 8300SEMINAR: SHAKESPEARE3
ENGL 8316MIDDLE ENGLISH LITERATURE3
ENGL 8326CHAUCER3
ENGL 8346SHAKESPEARE3
ENGL 8356SHAKESPEARE'S CONTEMPORARIES3
ENGL 8376RESTORATION AND 18TH CENTURY LITERATURE3
ENGL 8396MEDIEVAL CELTIC LITERATURE3
ENGL 8410IMMIGRATION, MIGRATION, AND DIASPORA: CRITICAL APPROACHES AND THEORIES OF MOVEMENT IN LITERATURE3
ENGL 8416LITERATURE OF THE ROMANTIC PERIOD3
ENGL 8426LITERATURE OF VICTORIAN PERIOD3
ENGL 8436THE 19TH CENTURY ENGLISH NOVEL3
ENGL 8450SEMINAR: JOHN MILTON3
ENGL 848620TH CENTURY ENGLISH LITERATURE3
ENGL 8500SEMINAR: RESTORATION AND 18TH CENTURY3
ENGL 8600SEMINAR: 19TH CENTURY ENGLISH LITERATURE3
ENGL 8610PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL WRITING3
ENGL 8615INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS3
ENGL 8620SEMINAR: JANE AUSTEN3
ENGL 8626HISTORY OF ENGLISH3
ENGL 8630DIGITAL RHETORIC3
ENGL 8640CREATIVE NONFICTION IN DIGITAL ENVIRONMENTS3
ENGL 8646APPLIED LINGUISTICS3
ENGL 8650WRITING ACROSS DIFFERENCES: RHETORICAL THEORY FOR PERSUASION AND PUBLIC ADVOCACY3
ENGL 8656STRUCTURE OF ENGLISH3
ENGL 8676SOCIOLINGUISTICS3
ENGL 8696TOPICS IN LINGUISTICS3
ENGL 8736RHETORIC3
ENGL 8740SEMINAR: DISCOURSE, CULTURE, AND POWER3
ENGL 8750OXBOW WRITING PROJECT3
ENGL 8756COMPOSITION THEORY & PEDAGOGY3
ENGL 8760/COMM 8200SEMINAR IN POPULAR CULTURE, MASS MEDIA AND VISUAL RHETORIC3
ENGL 8775WRITING CENTER THEORY, PEDAGOGY, AND RESEARCH3
ENGL 8780PEDAGOGIC FIELD EXPERIENCE IN TESOL3
ENGL 8796ENGLISH CAREER PREPARATION1
ENGL 8800SEMINAR: TOPICS IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE3
ENGL 8806ENGLISH INTERNSHIP1-3
ENGL 8816DIGITAL LITERACIES FOR TECHNICAL COMMUNICATORS3
ENGL 8826AUTOBIOGRAPHY3
ENGL/JMC 8836TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION3
ENGL 8846TRAVEL WRITING3
ENGL 8850SEM: SPIRITUAL NONFICTION3
ENGL/JMC 8856INFORMATION DESIGN FOR TECHNICAL COMMUNICATORS3
ENGL 8866THE MODERN FAMILIAR ESSAY3
ENGL 8870SEMINAR: PUBLISHING NON-FICTION3
ENGL/JMC 8876TECHNICAL EDITING3
ENGL 8880ADVANCED PLACEMENT INSTITUTE: ENGLISH & COMPOSITIONS3
ENGL 8886COMMUNITY SERVICE WRITING3
ENGL 8890SEM: EXPERIMENTS IN CREATIVE NONFICTION3
ENGL/JMC 8896CAPSTONE COURSE IN TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION3
ENGL 8900INDEPENDENT STUDY1-3
ENGL 8910SEMINAR: CRITICAL THEORY3
ENGL 8926GREAT CHARACTERS3
ENGL 8966TOPICS IN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE3

Coursework Outside English

With the approval of the student’s advisor and the English Graduate Program Committee, a student may include a minor or coursework from another related discipline or disciplines as part of the Plan of Study. For both the thesis and non-thesis options, a minor is 9 hours (3 courses). The maximum amount of coursework that may be applied from another discipline or disciplines is the same as that for a minor in both options (9 hours).

Exit Requirement

Option 1 Thesis:

  • ENGL 8990 Thesis 6 hours
  • Comprehensive Examination

Option 2 Non-Thesis:

  • Comprehensive Examination