College of Business Administration (CBA)

College of Business Administration Mission

UNO CBA provides a balance of academic perspectives with practical applications.

*We engage our students in learning experiences that enable them to become knowledgeable, motivated, and resourceful business professionals."

*We impact and transform practice and advance scholarly thought through research and diverse community engagement."

College of Business Administration Vision

As a premier College of Business Administration, UNO CBA will further our reputation as the region’s leading provider of business education and expertise.

UNO CBA Accreditation Information

The UNO College of Business Administration undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by AACSB - the International Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. This is the highest level of accreditation possible for a College of Business.

Program Contact Information

CBA Advising Office
UNO College of Business Administration
Mammel Hall 134
University of Nebraska at Omaha
6708 Pine Street
Omaha, NE 68182-0048

Advising Phone: 402-554-3419
e-mail: unocbainfo@unomaha.edu

Program Website
 

Admission Requirements

Incoming freshman must meet general university admission requirements to be admitted into the College of Business. Transfer students and current UNO students must have a minimum 2.50 cumulative GPA.

Other Information Relevant to the College of Business Administration

Attendance at First CBA Class Meeting

Students not present at the first class meeting of a College of Business Course, without prior notification to the instructor, may be administratively withdrawn from the course.

Choice of Catalog

A student registering in the College of Business Administration of UNO for the first time may, except for the following limitations, complete work for the degree according to:

  • The requirements of the catalog of the year in which you last entered the College and have since been in continuous enrollment (i.e., no enrollment gap of more than two consecutive semesters) OR
  • The catalog current at the time the student applied for the BSBA degree. For students continuously enrolled, a seven-year rule applies in that the catalog for students who have been continuously enrolled can only extend back seven years. Students enrolled for more than seven years will be moved up one catalog year at a time. For example, from 2000-01 to 2001-02.
  • The earliest catalog available to an intra-University transfer will be the catalog in use when the student transferred to the College of Business Administration

Beta Gamma Sigma

Beta Gamma Sigma is the national scholastic honor society in the field of business. Election to membership is available to both undergraduate and graduate students in business. Selection is based upon outstanding scholastic achievement.

Accounting

ACCT 2000  ACCOUNTING BASICS FOR NON-BUSINESS MAJORS (3 credits)

This course is designed to provide non-business students with an understanding of basic accounting terms and concepts, an understanding of the usefulness of accounting data for decision-making by internal and external business stakeholders, and the skills to actually use accounting data in decision-making.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Student must be a non-business student. ENGL 1150 and MATH 1310 with 'C-'(2.0) or better. Not open to non-degree graduate students

Distribution: Social Science General Education course

ACCT 2010  PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING I (3 credits)

Basic concepts and assumptions underlying financial accounting; basic structure of accounting; the accounting cycle; external financial statements of the enterprise with emphasis on the corporation; income determination; accounting for and reporting of assets, liabilities and owners' equity; analysis and reporting of cash flows; financial statement analysis.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): 18 earned credits, MATH1310 with a 'C'(2.0) or better, and a 2.3 GPA.

ACCT 2020  PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING II (3 credits)

A study of techniques and concepts affecting internal accounting in a business organization. These include budgeting in general, costing systems, variance analysis and generating reports for management decision-making. Special topics include segment reporting, control of decentralized operations, capital budgeting, and service department cost allocations.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ACCT2010 with a C (2.0) or better and a 2.3 GPA.

ACCT 3000  MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING FOR SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

This course highlights the important role of a managerial accountant in managing a global supply chain and covers the key accounting techniques for supply chain management. (Cross-listed with SCMT 3000)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ACCT 2020 with a grade of C (2.0) or better or ACCT 2000 with a grade of C (2.0) or better and cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

ACCT 3020  BASIC FEDERAL INCOME TAXATION (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts and principles of federal income tax with an emphasis on concepts unique to individual taxpayers.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ACCT 2020, ECON 2200 and ECON 2220 with a 'C' (2.0) or better in each course. Cumulative GPA of at least 2.5.

ACCT 3030  INTERMEDIATE FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING I (3 credits)

A more intensive study of basic accounting theory and principles learned in ACCT 2010. Topics include a conceptual framework of accounting, net income concepts, financial statements, present value applications, current assets, plant assets, intangible assets and liabilities. (Fall, Spring)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ACCT 2020, ECON 2200, and ECON 2220, with a grade of 'C' (2.0) or better in each course and a 2.5 GPA.

ACCT 3040  INTERMEDIATE FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING II (3 credits)

This is the second of two courses in intermediate financial accounting. It focuses on financial reporting issues relating to stockholders' equity, leases, pensions and other postretirement benefits, and income taxes. Other topics include earnings per share and cash flows. It is intended for students who plan to major in accounting. However, it would also be useful for prospective users of financial statements. (Fall, Spring)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ACCT 3030 with a 'C' (2.0) or better.

ACCT 3050  INTERMEDIATE MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING (3 credits)

The objective of managerial accounting is to provide management with relevant and timely information to aid economic decision making. This course analyzes numerous economic decisions and identifies what information is relevant. Special attention is given to how different cost accumulation systems and different cost accounting and estimating techniques can aid the decision-making process.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ACCT 2020, ECON 2200, ECON 2220, and BSAD 2130, BSAD 3140 or BSAD 3160, with a "C" (2.0) or better in each. Cumulative GPA of at least 2.5.

ACCT 3080  ACCOUNTING INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3 credits)

Introduction to professional accounting information systems, including information systems concepts, accounting and database software and research tools to provide a foundation for subsequent accounting courses.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ACCT 2020, ECON 2200 and ECON 2220, BSAD 3100, with "C" (2.0) or better in each. Cumulative GPA of at least 2.5.

ACCT 4000  SPECIAL TOPICS IN ACCOUNTING (1-3 credits)

The course content and topic will vary. Please contact the CBA for specific course offerings.

ACCT 4010  ADVANCED FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (3 credits)

Specialized issues in financial accounting. Principal topics include business combinations and consolidated financial statements, partnership accounting, translation of foreign currency financial statements, accounting for foreign currency denominated transactions, and SEC reporting requirements. (Cross-listed with ACCT 8016)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ACCT 3030 and ACCT 3040 with "C+" (2.33) or better in each. Cumulative GPA of at least 2.5. Cumulative upper-division Accounting GPA of at least 2.5.

ACCT 4020  ADVANCED ACCOUNTING INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3 credits)

Specialized issues in computerized accounting information systems. Principal topics include advanced spreadsheet analysis, data capture and cleansing, database development and implementation, and the use of accounting information for business decisions. Emphasis is on reporting objectives, documentation, security, internal controls, and the evaluation and selection of software. (Cross-listed with ACT 8026)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ACCT 3080 with C+ (2.33) or better. Cumulative GPA of at least 2.5. Cumulative upper-division Accounting GPA of at least 2.5.

ACCT 4040  ADVANCED FEDERAL INCOME TAXATION (3 credits)

Analysis of various advanced tax issues, such as accounting methods, property transactions, and formation, operation, and liquidation of C-corporations, S-corporations and partnerships. (Cross-listed with ACCT 8046.)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ACCT 3020 and ACCT 3030, both with a "C" (2.0) or better. Cumulative GPA of at least 2.5. Cumulative upper-division Accounting GPA of at least 2.5.

ACCT 4060  ADVANCED MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING (3 credits)

Intensive study and discussion of the responsibilities of managerial accountants in the decision-making process in organizations and the consequences of the manner in which they use cost accounting information in decision-making. (Cross-listed with ACCT 8066.)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ACCT 3050 with "C" (2.0) or better and ACCT 3030 with "C" (2.0) or better. Cumulative GPA of at least 2.5. Cumulative upper-division Accounting GPA of at least 2.5.

ACCT 4070  GOVERNMENTAL/NONPROFIT ACCOUNTING AND AUDITING (3 credits)

Study of budgeting, accounting, financial reporting and auditing in governmental and nonprofit entities. (Cross-listed with ACCT 8076.)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ACCT 3030 with a "C" (2.0) or better. Cumulative GPA of at least 2.5. Cumulative upper-division accounting GPA of at least 2.5.

ACCT 4080  PRINCIPLES OF AUDITING (3 credits)

An introduction to auditing, Standards, responsibilities, professional ethics, the audit framework, evidence and reports are studied.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ACCT 3030, ACCT 3080, and BSAD 2130 or BSAD 3160, with a "C" (2.0) or better in each. Cumulative GPA of at least 2.5. Cumulative upper-division Accounting GPA of at least 2.5.

ACCT 4090  INFORMATION SYSTEMS AUDITING (3 credits)

This course will provide an introduction of auditing an advanced accounting information system. Content studied will include professional standards, guidelines, and procedures promulgated by the Information Systems Audit and Control Association. Accounting information systems control and security practices, and their assessment, will be discussed in the areas of operations, physical and logical access, systems, networks, development and applications, and incorporating hands-on exposure to automated evaluation tools.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ACCT 4080 with a grade of C (2.0) or better. Cumulative GPA of at least 2.5. Cumulative upper-division Accounting GPA of at least 2.5.

ACCT 4500  INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3 credits)

Individual investigation of specific problems in the field of accounting.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Must have permission of the accounting department.

ACCT 4510  ACCOUNTING INTERNSHIP (1-3 credits)

A course for junior or senior accounting students to apply their academic accounting knowledge to accounting practice in an employment situation. A student report on the internship experience and an employer's evaluation of the student's performance are course requirements. Can be applied to free electives, but not accounting specialization electives. (Maximum of 3 hours)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ACCT 3030 with a C (2.0) or better, and permission of internship coordinator.

Economics

ECON 1200  AN INTRODUCTION TO THE U.S. ECONOMY (3 credits)

An introduction to U.S. economy and an investigation of U.S. and international economic problems and policies.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Not available to students who have completed either ECON 2200 or 2220.

Distribution: Social Science General Education course

ECON 2000  SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS (1-5 credits)

The course content and topic will vary. Please contact the CBA for specific course offerings.

ECON 2200  PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS (MICRO) (3 credits)

An introduction to economic principles, decision making and policies affecting product and resource markets. Particular emphasis is on price, output and input decisions by individuals and firms under various market conditions. An introduction to the fundamentals of international trade.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ENGL 1150 and MATH 1310 with 'C-' (1.67) or better.

Distribution: Social Science General Education course

ECON 2220  PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS (MACRO) (3 credits)

An introduction to economic principles, decision making and policies on national income and output, employment, growth, money, the price level and the international economy.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MATH 1310, ENGL 1150, and ECON 2200 with a 'C-' (1.67) or better.

Distribution: Social Science General Education course

ECON 2400  PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS FOR EDUCATORS (3 credits)

This course is designed to teach principles of microeconomics and macroeconomics to K-12 educators. After taking this course students will be able to use the economic way of thinking to study current economic issues. Students will be introduced to macroeconomic principles, decision- making and policies on national income and output, employment, growth, money, price level, and fundamentals of international issues. In addition students will study microeconomic issues including product and resource markets, and prices output and input decisions under various market conditions. Economic concepts will be aligned to K-12 state social studies standards. This course cannot be substituted for ECON2200 and/or ECON2220.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MATH1310, ENGL1150. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

ECON 3100  AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS (3 credits)

Introduction to American agricultural structure and production with special emphasis on production methods and technology, farm supply industry, markets and marketing systems, domestic and foreign trade, government programs, farm organizations and financial institutions.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MATH 1310, ECON 2200 and ECON 2220, each with a "C" (2.0) or better, or permission of instructor.

ECON 3130  ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY (3 credits)

A comprehensive study of production, consumption and exchange in primary, secondary and tertiary economic activities as related to spatial factors. (Cross-listed with GEOG 3130).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MATH 1310, ECON 2200, and ECON 2220, each with a "C" (2.0) or better.

ECON 3150  LABOR ECONOMICS (3 credits)

The course examines labor supply issues including work-leisure decisions and cost-benefit decisions relative to education and training and labor demand issues including wage determination in competitive and monopsonistic labor markets and when union or labor market discrimination are present. Also, the course examines issues related to employment, unemployment, labor force participation and labor productivity.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MATH 1310 and ECON 2200, each with a "C" (2.0) or better.

ECON 3180  COLLECTIVE BARGAINING (3 credits)

The course studies the issues and procedures of collective bargaining in the private and public sectors. The history and organization of the American labor movement are examined, including the relevant legislation and court cases. Students participate in an in-class collective bargaining exercise.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MATH 1310 and ECON 2200, each with a "C" (2.0) or better.

ECON 3200  ECONOMIC THEORY: MICRO (3 credits)

Analysis of individual, firm and industry behavior in product and factor markets. Provides a theoretical foundation for managerial and public policy decision-making.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MATH 1310 and ECON 2200, each with a "C" (2.0) or better.

ECON 3220  ECONOMIC THEORY: MACRO (3 credits)

The course teaches the theory and practice of how the domestic economy works, critically evaluates the economic policies of the federal government and the Federal Reserve that attempt to solve economic problems, discusses the economy in a global environment, and explains how new capital and technology enhance the ability of business management and labor to compete in the domestic and international markets.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MATH 1310, ECON 2200 and ECON 2220, each with a "C" (2.0) or better.

ECON 3250  BUSINESS CONDITIONS ANALYSIS (3 credits)

The course is a study of business fluctuations in the national economy. The causes and measurement of cyclical fluctuations are examined. The relationship between the domestic economy and other major economies of the world is studied. Macroeconomic stabilization policies and economic forecasting are important topics in this course.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MATH 1310, ECON 2200 and ECON 2220, each with a "C" (2.0) or better.

ECON 3260  EVOLUTION OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT (3 credits)

Tracing the evolution of economic thought from the medieval through the current period. Focus is on the interactions of institutional milieu, thought and economic doctrine.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MATH 1310, ECON 2200 and ECON 2220, each with a "C" (2.0) or better.

ECON 3300  INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMETRICS (3 credits)

An introduction to empirical research methods in economics. Subjects covered include estimations of the basic linear regression model, hypothesis testing, correlation coefficients, analysis of variance, multicollinearity, dummy variables, specification error, auto-correlation, heteroscedasticity and unconditional forecasting. Empirical illustrations are provided by reference to contemporary economic questions.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MATH 1310, ECON 2200, ECON 2220, BSAD 2130 or BSAD 3160, each with a "C" (2.0) or better, or permission of instructor.

ECON 3320  INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL AND NATURAL RESOURCE ECONOMICS (3 credits)

This course explores the economic approach to environmental and natural resources. It introduces economic concepts and theory at a level accessible to non-economic majors but still challenging to economic majors. It then applies these to such topics as: air and water pollution, solid and hazardous waste management, renewable and nonrenewable natural resource use, and recycling.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MATH 1310 and ECON 2200, each with a "C" (2.0) or better.

ECON 3350  COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS (3 credits)

Analysis of the underlying concepts and characteristic features of modern economic systems.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MATH 1310, ECON 2200 and ECON 2220, each with a "C" (2.0) or better., or permission of instructor.

ECON 3550  PUBLIC FINANCE (3 credits)

Objectives and rationale of government activity in a market economy. Public choice. Positive and normative analysis of public expenditures. Social Security, food stamps, student aid, and unemployment insurance. Efficiency and incidence of major revenue sources and tax reform proposals. (Cross-listed with FNBK 3550).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MATH 1310, ECON 2200 and ECON 2220, each with a "C" (2.0) or better.

ECON 3600  INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS (3 credits)

An introduction to analyses of international trade and international monetary system. Subjects covered include the economic basis for international specialization and trade, the effect of trade on income distribution, commercial policy, economic integration, the balance of payments, adjustment mechanism, exchange rate determination, external effects of monetary and fiscal policy and foreign investment.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MATH 1310, ECON 2200 and ECON 2220, each with a "C" (2.0) or better.

ECON 3800  MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS (3 credits)

This course provides analytical tools and techniques to help managers find solutions to their day-to-day decision problems. It is concerned with the motivation of the firm and how decisions should be made. Among the topics that are covered are: optimization techniques, demand, production, costs, market structure, strategic behavior, pricing techniques and international issues.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MATH 1310 and ECON 2200, each with a "C" (2.0) or better.

ECON 4000  SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS (1-5 credits)

The course content and topic will vary. Please contact the economics department for specific course offerings.

ECON 4150  HUMAN RESOURCES ECONOMICS (3 credits)

Employment statistics and forecasts; labor force composition and change; alternative labor market concepts; investment in human capital; government manpower programs; human resource planning within organizations.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MATH 1310, ECON 2200 and ECON 2220, each with a "C" (2.0) or better, or permission of instructor.

ECON 4210  INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION (3 credits)

This course applies economic analysis to public policy issues in industrial economics. It is concerned with the strategic behavior of firms: the nature of interaction among competing firms within a game-theory framework. Among the topics covered are: discriminatory pricing, predatory conduct, product design, patent infringement, price wars, location decisions, and entry-deterrence. (Cross-listed with ECON 8216).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MATH 1310, ECON 2200 and ECON 2220, each with a "C" (2.0) or better, or permission of instructor.

ECON 4260  HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT (3 credits)

The first half of the course focuses on the development of economics from Adam Smith in 1776 to John Maynard Keynes in the 1930s. The second half uses the history sketched in the first half as a partial basis for addressing important questions about methodology, institutional structure and policy impact of economics. (Cross-Listed with ECON 8266).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MATH 1310, ECON 2200 and ECON 2220, each with a "C" (2.0) or better.

ECON 4290  RESEARCH METHODS IN ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS (3 credits)

Covers the methodology of economics: choosing a research topic, literature search tools, data source identification, data summary techniques, basic statistical data analysis using statistical packages, and clear economics writing. The student will become familiar with these techniques through text materials, journal studies, and completion of an empirical economics paper.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ECON 2200, ECON 2220, ECON 3200, and ECON 3220 or permission of the instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

ECON 4300  QUANTITATIVE APPLICATIONS IN ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS (3 credits)

The study and application of modern quantitative techniques to problem-solving in economics and business. (Cross-listed with ECON 8306).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MATH 1310, ECON 2200 and ECON 2220, each with a "C"(2.0) or better, or permission of instructor.

ECON 4320  NATURAL RESOURCE ECONOMICS (3 credits)

Energy, minerals, fisheries, water, land, pollution and congestion are among the topics. The course covers the basic theoretical framework for understanding the optimal rate of resource use, identifies the factors which determine the actual rate of use, and considers and evaluates various public policy prescriptions. (Cross-listed with ECON 8326).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MATH 1310, ECON 2200 and ECON 2220, each with a "C" (2.0) or better, or permission of instructor.

ECON 4340  ECONOMICS OF TECHNOLOGY (3 credits)

The seminar discusses whether innovation is more driven by demand or supply forces, the optimal timing of adoption of new technology, whether new technology benefits workers and consumers, and whether government is successful at supporting promising new technology. (Cross-listed with ECON 8346).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MATH 1310 and ECON 2200, each with a "C" (2.0) or better, or BSAD 8180, or permission of instructor.

ECON 4450  MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY (3 credits)

Monetary policy has an important effect on economic magnitudes, including the level of output, interest rates, inflation rates, exchange rates, and many other variables. This course provides an in-depth analysis of the role that the Federal Reserve plays in our economy. This involves how monetary policy is transmitted to various markets. (Cross-listed with ECON 8456).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ECON 3220, or permission of instructor.

ECON 4500  SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN ECONOMICS (2-3 credits)

Individual investigation of specific problems in the field of economics. (Fall, Spring)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Senior and permission of department chair.

ECON 4510  ECONOMIC INTERNSHIP (1-3 credits)

(maximum of 3 credits) Students engage in part time employment in their area of specialization to gain relevant business experience and to practice the skills and concepts learned in the classroom. Supplemental reports and/or reading may be required.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Permission of internship coordinator; 'C' (2.0) or better in ECON 2200 and ECON 2220; 2.5 Cumulative GPA; junior or senior standing.

ECON 4560  STATE AND LOCAL FINANCE (3 credits)

Theoretical and policy analysis of state and local government fiscal behavior. Revenues, expenditures, borrowing, and intergovernmental fiscal relations. Applications to education, transportation, and economic development. (Cross-listed with ECON 8566).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MATH 1310, ECON 2200 and ECON 2220, each with a "C" (2.0) or better.

ECON 4610  INTERNATIONAL TRADE (3 credits)

An analysis of the character of international economic relations. Subjects covered include the economic basis for international specialization and trade, the economic gains from trade, commercial policy, economic integration and economic growth. (Cross-listed with ECON 8616).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MATH 1310, ECON 2200 and ECON 2220, each with a "C" (2.0) or better, or permission of instructor.

ECON 4620  INTERNATIONAL MONETARY ECONOMICS (3 credits)

An analysis of the international monetary system. Subjects covered include the balance of payments adjustment mechanism, alternative exchange rate systems, external effects of monetary and fiscal policy, foreign investments and international monetary reform. (Cross-listed with ECON 8626).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MATH 1310, ECON 2200 and ECON 2220, each with a "C" (2.0) or better, or permission of instructor.

ECON 4660  INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (3 credits)

Problems relating to early stages of economic development; investment priorities, mobilizing savings and policies and programs are studied. (Cross-listed with ECON 8666).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MATH 1310, ECON 2200 and ECON 2220, each with a "C" (2.0) or better, or permission of instructor.

ECON 4700  ECONOMICS OF EBUSINESS (3 credits)

The course will be conducted as a seminar with ample student participation, including a research paper. A 'New Economy' has often been identified with the rise of e-business. We will examine whether the rise of e-business has brought with it a change in the rules of the economy, and we will look at the effects of e-business on business, labor, consumers, and the stock market. (Cross-listed with ECON 8706, BSAD 8706).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Admission to the MBA program; or admission to the economics graduate program; or senior economics undergraduate or permission of instructor.

ECON 4730  ECONOMICS OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP (3 credits)

This course will review economic theories of entrepreneurship with special emphasis on Schumpeter's theory of creative destruction. The main focus of the seminar will be on the "high-level" entrepreneurship that sometimes results in major innovations. This course will address the societal benefits of entrepreneurship, factors influencing entrepreneurial success, the policies that best encourage entrepreneurship, and how firms can survive and prosper in an entrepreneurial environment. (Cross-listed with ECON 8736, BSAD 8736).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ECON 2200 or permission of the instructor for all students

ECON 4850  ECONOMICS OF URBAN AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT (3 credits)

This course will consider factors and trends in development at the global and national level but will focus primarily on economic development at the state, local, and regional levels in the United States. The focus of this course will be real world strategic planning for economic development. (Cross-listed with ECON 8856)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MATH 1310, ECON 2200 and ECON 2220, each with a "C" (2.0) or better, or permission of instructor.

ECON 4910  SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS (1-3 credits)

(May be repeated up to 6) A series of special courses each designed to focus on current major topics and developments in a specific area of economics or business, scheduled as a workshop or seminar according to purpose. (Cross-listed with BSAD 8916, ECON 8916).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate student in good standing or advanced undergraduate student and as indicated for specific workshop or seminar.

Finance and Banking

FNBK 2280  PERSONAL FINANCE (3 credits)

A study of the personal and family finance designed to assist the student develop sound financial habits. (Fall, Spring)

FNBK 2710  PRINCIPLES OF INSURANCE (3 credits)

This course is intended to introduce students to the basic concepts of risk and insurance. Special emphasis is placed on the insurance coverage needed by the consumer: life, health, homeowner and auto insurance. (Fall, Spring)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Not open to non-degree graduate students.

FNBK 3000  FINANCIAL REPORTING AND ANALYSIS (3 credits)

Seeks to develop students' understanding of the origin and derivation of accounting data, and their skills in employing the data for the purpose of financial analysis, reporting and valuation.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ACCT 2020 with 'C' (2.0) or better.

FNBK 3250  PRINCIPLES OF FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

As a comprehensive introduction to financial management, the course will cover various fields of finance and discuss topics including the time value of money, bond and stock valuation, capital budgeting.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ACCT 2020, ECON 2200, ECON 2220, MATH 1320 or MATH 1370, BSAD 2130 or BSAD 3160, and MGMT 3200 each with a 'C'(2.0) or better; 2.5 cumulative GPA.

FNBK 3330  ENTREPRENEURIAL FINANCE (3 credits)

This course focuses on venture capital formation and the financing of entrepreneurial ventures. The course is intended for students interested in entrepreneurship, venture capital markets, investment banking, and other careers related to new venture financing and/or deal structuring. The course applies basic financial theory to the unique environment of incubating and growing new ventures.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): FNBK 3250 with 'C' (2.0) or better.

FNBK 3400  INVESTMENT PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES (3 credits)

A study of the market for investment securities, an introduction to the field of security analysis, and selection and management of a portfolio of securities. (Fall, Spring)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): FNBK 3250 with 'C+' (2.33) or better, or approval of instructor.

FNBK 3500  FINANCIAL MARKETS (3 credits)

An overview of money and banking, monetary policy, and analysis of the operations of financial markets in a global context, as well as the evolving regulatory framework within which these markets operate.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ECON 2200 and ECON 2220 and FNBK 3250 with 'C' or better, or approval of instructor.

FNBK 3550  PUBLIC FINANCE (3 credits)

Objectives and rationale of government activity in a market economy. Public choice. Positive and normative analysis of public expenditures. Social Security, food stamps, student aid, and unemployment insurance. Efficiency and incidence of major revenue sources and tax reform proposals. (Cross-listed with ECON 3550).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MATH 1310, ECON 2200 and ECON 2220, each with a "C" (2.0) or better.

FNBK 3650  COMMERCIAL BANK MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

A study of the organization, structure and operation of commercial banks with an emphasis on the banking functions, competitive aspects and the nature and framework of regulation.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): FNBK 3250 with 'C' (2.0) or better.

FNBK 3700  INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

Application of basic principles and techniques of international financial management to the decision-making process of the multinational firm. The course covers the foreign exchange markets, management of the foreign exchange risk, international working capital management, and foreign portfolio and direct investment. Factors bearing on the international financing and investment decisions, such as political risk and international taxation issues will be also examined. (Fall, Spring, Summer).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): FNBK 3250 with 'C+' (2.3) or better or approval of instructor.

FNBK 4000  SPECIAL TOPICS IN FINANCE AND BANKING (1-5 credits)

The course content and topic will vary. Please contact the CBA for specific course offerings.

FNBK 4150  INTERMEDIATE FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

Seeks to develop the students' ability to identify, analyze and solve integrative problems in management of business finance, including financial analysis, working capital management, capital budgeting decisions, long term financing, and leasing, through the use of prescribed readings, case studies and computer applications. (Fall, Spring).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): FNBK 3250 with 'C+' (2.33) or better, GPA of 2.5 or better, and senior standing. It is highly recommended that a student have an additional 6 hours of finance instruction beyond the introductory course prior to taking this class.

FNBK 4500  SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN FINANCE AND BANKING (2-3 credits)

Individual investigation of specific problems in the fields of finance and banking. (Fall, Spring).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Senior. Note: permission of department chair required prior to registration.

FNBK 4510  FINANCE AND BANKING INTERNSHIP (1-3 credits)

Students will engage in an applied experience in their area of specialization to gain relevant experience and to practice the skills and concepts learned in the classroom. Supplemental reports and/or reading may be required. Note: FNBK4510 may be taken for a maximum of 3 credits.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Permission of internship coordinator; 'C' or better in FNBK 3250; 2.5 cumulative gpa; junior or senior standing

FNBK 4560  STATE & LOCAL FINANCE (3 credits)

Theoretical and policy analysis of state and local government fiscal behavior. Revenues, expenditures, borrowing, and intergovernmental fiscal relations. Applications to education, transportation and economic development. (Cross-listed with BSAD 8566).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ECON 2200 and ECON 2220.

FNBK 4570  INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT FOR FINANCIAL ANALYSTS (3 credits)

This course provides critical knowledge needed for students pursuing a career in investment management. The topic areas bridge academic theory, current industry practice, and ethical and professional standards and comprehensively address the areas assessed in the Chartered Financial Analyst examinations. (Cross-listed with BSAD 8576).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Senior standing. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

FNBK 4590  RISK MANAGEMENT FOR BUSINESS MANAGERS (3 credits)

An analysis of risk management techniques for handling the risk exposures most businesses face, including insurance, self insurance, risk control and risk avoidance, among others. (Cross-listed with BSAD 8596).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): At least junior standing.

FNBK 4600  FINANCIAL RISK MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

The course introduces students to the financial derivatives market, and the use (or abuse) of derivative instruments for risk management (or speculative) purposes. It employs computer applications to illustrate various hedging strategies with derivative instruments. (Cross-listed with BSAD 8606).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): FNBK 3400 and FNBK 3500 both with a 'C' (2.0) or better, and senior or graduate standing.

FNBK 4610  PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

This course will focus on modern development in portfolio management including efficient markets, stock selection, and hedging procedures. The main objective of this course is to prepare students for the management of financial resources through the development of skills necessary to make prudent investment decisions.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): FNBK 3400 with a "C+" (2.33) or above, and a 2.5 GPA.

Law and Society

LAWS 2000  SPECIAL TOPICS IN LAW AND SOCIETY (1-5 credits)

The course content and topic will vary. Please contact the CBA for specific course offerings.

LAWS 3170  ETHICS IN BUSINESS (3 credits)

Application of ethical concepts and principles to moral issues in business: corporate responsibility, discrimination, advertising, competition, whistle-blowing, trade secrets, multinationals, environment, workers' rights, government regulation, investment, bribes, product liability and consumerism.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ECON 2200 and ECON 2220.

LAWS 3460  REAL ESTATE LAW (3 credits)

This course is concerned with the sources of real estate law, both cases and statutes, and covers estates in land, conveyances, leases, mortgages, easements, zoning, brokers, contracts, taxes, foreclosures and open occupancy. (Fall, Spring) (Cross-listed with RELU 3460)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): RELU 2410 or RELU 3410.

LAWS 3930  BUSINESS LAW FUNDAMENTALS (3 credits)

LAWS 3930 introduces students to the legal system governing business transactions. This course emphasizes constitutional law, the Common Law, and relevant statutory law. The legal topics covered include litigation and ADR, torts, contracts, Sale of Goods, insurance, international law, and regulation of business.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ENGL 1160, CMST 1110, ECON 2200, & MGMT 3200 all with 'C'(2.0) or better, 2.5 GPA.

LAWS 3940  LEGAL AND ETHICAL APPLICATIONS (3 credits)

LAWS 3940 exposes students to business organization law and ethics. Emphasis is on business organizations (e.g., agency, partnerships, corporations), financial transactions (e.g., checks, liens, securities), and property (e.g., environment, intellectual). Ethics is a discrete subject area studied and its analytical tools are applied to all of these areas of law.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): LAWS 3930 and ACCT 2020 both with C+ (2.3) or better; 2.5 GPA

LAWS 4220  LEGAL ISSUES IN MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

Overview of the general nature of legal knowledge in human resources administration. The course is designed to alert students of the legal considerations when an employer-employee relationship is established. Discusses how human resource practices have been impacted by recent legal developments, anti-discrimination laws, affirmative action and labor relations. (Spring)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MGMT 3490 with a C+ or better, MGMT 3510 with a C(2.0) or better, and a 2.5 GPA

LAWS 4500  SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN LAW AND SOCIETY (1-6 credits)

Individual investigation of specific problems in the field of business law. (Fall, Spring)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Senior and permission of program chair.

LAWS 4510  LAW AND SOCIETY INTERNSHIP (1-3 credits)

(maximum of 3 credits) Students engage in part time employment in their area of specialization to gain relevant business experience and to practice the skills and concepts learned in the classroom. Supplemental reports and or reading may be required.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Permission of internship coordinator; 'C' (2.0) or better in Laws 3930; 2.5 cumulative gpa; junior or senior standing.

LAWS 4910  SEMINAR ON BUSINESS LAW (3 credits)

Contact the instructor since the content will vary from semester to semester, but will have a strong emphasis on current events. The course will focus on one aspect of relationship between government and business, and its related ethical and international law issues. A major student research project is included.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): LAWS 3930 and ECON 2200, its equivalent, or permission of department chair.

LAWS 4930  INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS LAW (3 credits)

This course is designed to inform students interested in international business transactions of the major legal principles governing international law, the major legal systems affecting the conduct of international business transactions, the domestic and foreign policies of the United States which affect business overseas, and foreign business inside American borders.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): LAWS 3930.

Management

MGMT 1500  INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS (3 credits)

This course is for students who are interested in gaining foundational knowledge in many aspects of the business world including economics, finance, marketing, management, and accounting.

Distribution: Social Science General Education course

MGMT 2000  SPECIAL TOPICS IN MANAGEMENT (1-5 credits)

The course content and topic will vary. Please contact the CBA for specific course offerings.

MGMT 2010  MINORITIES IN THE PRIVATE ENTRPRISE SYSTEM (3 credits)

To acquaint students with the opportunities, challenges and successes in minority businesses. Emphasis is given to the role of the individual and importance of these businesses to the aggregate economic structure. Additionally, the opportunities for minorities in majority-owned businesses. (Spring)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): 2.0 GPA

MGMT 2800  SURVEY OF BUSINESS (3 credits)

A four-part survey of business: a study of the foundation of business, an analysis of the functional relationships within the business concerns, a discussion of the societal issues confronting contemporary business and the simulation of business operations by means of a computer. Although open to all students, it is intended for non-business majors who want to develop a basic understanding of the world of business and management. (Fall, Spring)

MGMT 3100  MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3 credits)

The course covers a broad spectrum of knowledge and techniques in MIS. It presents an overview of the issues and strategies in managing IT resources for organizational effectiveness. Covered topics include but are not limited to IT planning, network computing, functional information systems and their integration, electronic commerce, decision support systems, and data and knowledge management.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ACCT 2020 , MGMT 3200, and MGMT 3490, each with a 'C' (2.0) or better, and a 2.5 GPA. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

MGMT 3490  MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

In this course, students will develop a clear understanding of management concepts, develop critical thinking skills in applying management concepts to real world problems and begin to develop the technical, interpersonal, communication, conceptual and decision-making skills that are important to success as a manager in modern organizations. Current management trends are emphasized.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ENGL 1160 and MGMT 3200 each with a "C"(2.0) or above, and a 2.5 cumulative GPA.

MGMT 3510  HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

This course is a comprehensive review of human resource management concepts and practices. The course is designed to educate future managers and leaders on the importance of utilizing effective human resource methods that comply with federal laws and provide the organization with high-quality talent that provides a competitive advantage.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MGMT 3490 with a C+ or better and a 2.5 GPA; or permission of instructor.

MGMT 3600  BUSINESS ETHICS (3 credits)

Students will learn about the factors, opportunities and pressures that lead to ethical dilemmas, and will develop their understanding of foundations and processes that encourage and reward ethical decision making and behaviors. Lots of examples, sourced from case studies and current events will be provided. (Cross-listed with BSAD 3600, MKT 3600)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Junior classification (minimum of 58 earned credit hours) with a minimum 2.5 cumulative GPA. Completion of MGMT 3200 with a minimum grade of ''C' (2.0). Not open to non-degree graduate students.

MGMT 4000  SPECIAL TOPICS IN MANAGEMENT (1-6 credits)

This special topics course will address specific topics which will vary by semester and is intended primarily for upper division students who are pursuing a management concentration.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Permission from the Department of Management chairperson.

MGMT 4010  TOTAL REWARDS (3 credits)

This course is a comprehensive review of the theory and practice of developing and implementing cost-effective employee compensation and benefit programs. The course is designed to enable future managers and human resource professionals to utilize effective strategies for managing the single largest controllable expense for organizations; employee pay and benefits.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MGMT 3490 and MGMT 3510 with a C+ or better and a 2.5 GPA; or permission of instructor.

MGMT 4020  SEMINAR IN HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

A student project and seminar course which provides an in-depth examination of topics such as personnel selection, compensation, training and development, performance appraisal, health safety and labor relations. (Spring)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MGMT 3490 with a C+ or better, MGMT 3510 with a C (2.0) or better, and a 2.5 GPA; or permission of instructor.

MGMT 4040  ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR (3 credits)

In this course students will learn the knowledge and skills necessary to effectively manage and lead others. The discussion and application of topics such as leadership, motivation and attitudes will provide a theoretical grounding in these areas and the opportunity to practice applying these concepts to real-world problems.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MGMT 3490 with a C+ or better and a 2.5 GPA; or permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

MGMT 4050  MANAGERIAL DECISION MAKING (3 credits)

Students will have the opportunity to understand and apply techniques for effective individual and organizational problem solving. The students will interactively participate in generating, prioritizing and organizing their ideas in order to become better managerial decision-makers/problem solvers.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MGMT 3490 with a C+ or better and a 2.5 GPA; or permission of instructor

MGMT 4090  PRINCIPLES OF COLLABORATION (3 credits)

Students will work with techniques for team leadership, interpersonal collaboration, consensus-building, creative problem solving, negotiation, facilitation, group process design, collaborative workspace design, and collaboration engineering. Students will gain hands-on experience with collaboration technologies. (Cross-listed with BSAD 8096, ITIN 4090)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Junior standing or permission of instructor.

MGMT 4100  ORGANIZATION CHANGE AND DESIGN (3 credits)

This course is designed to increase students' understanding and knowledge of how organizations are designed and structured in order to create value and competitive advantage, and how organizations can operate in an effective and efficient manner in an ever-changing environment.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MGMT 3490 with a C+ or better and a 2.5 GPA; or permission of instructor.

MGMT 4110  STAFFING THE ORGANIZATION (3 credits)

This course is a comprehensive review of issues and techniques related to the acquisition of high-quality human resources for optimal organizational effectiveness. The course is designed to enable future managers and human resource professionals to utilize effective strategies for recruiting, selecting, placing, and integrating new employees into the organization's workforce.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MGMT 3490 and MGMT 3510 with a C+ or better and a 2.5 GPA; or permission of instructor. Students are encouraged to take MGMT 4220 prior to taking this course.

MGMT 4120  TALENT DEVELOPMENT (3 credits)

This course is a comprehensive review of the theory and practice of developing and implementing cost-effective employee training and development programs to optimize human capital effectiveness in modern organizations. The course is designed to enable future managers and human resource professionals to utilize effective strategies for assessing employee training needs and developing appropriate solutions to maximize talent utilization.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MGMT 3490 and MGMT 3510 with a C+ or better and a 2.5 GPA; or permission of instructor.

MGMT 4150  INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

The purpose of this course is to explore management theory and practice from an international or cross-cultural perspective to gain an appreciation for the complexities of managing in diverse cultural, political and economics environments. Specific emphasis is placed on studying the challenges of management and organization in multinational corporations.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MGMT 3490 with a C+ or better and a 2.5 GPA, or permission of instructor.

MGMT 4220  EMPLOYMENT LAW (3 credits)

This course is a comprehensive review of the legal framework in human resource management practice. The course is designed to prepare future managers and human resource professionals for the myriad legal issues involved in the employer-employee relationship and what is required for effective compliance. (Spring)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MGMT 3490 with a C+ or better, MGMT 3510 with a C (2.0) or better, 2.5 GPA; or permission of instructor.

MGMT 4230  APPLIED LEADERSHIP FOR MANAGERS (3 credits)

The course provides an introduction to applied leadership concepts and practices. Students are given a background into systematic decision-making processes, and then are introduced to cases of how actual leaders think and solve problems. Building on these foundational models, students learn how to perform problem solving requirements they will experience as managers. Finally, it concludes with a look at psychological biases and traps that may affect decision-makers.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MGMT 3490 with a C+ or better, a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5, or permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

MGMT 4330  PROJECT MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

This course will focus on the planning and execution of complex projects within an organization. Students will learn how to conduct stakeholder analysis, plan the scope of a project, develop a project budget, lead a project team, and define the steps necessary to bring a complex project to a successful conclusion. Students will recognize how the strategy, structure, and culture of an organization can be used to identify and prioritize complex projects. (Cross-listed with SCMT 4330, BSAD 8336)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MGMT 3490 with a C+ or better and a 2.5 GPA; or permission of the instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

MGMT 4340  MANAGEMENT OF TEAMS (3 credits)

Students have the opportunity to learn how to create teamwork, develop team dialogue, lead and share leadership in teams, solve problems and make team decisions, and handle team pressure, conflicts and role responsibilities. Application of tools and techniques to develop each of these topics is an integral part of this course.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MGMT 3490 with a C+ or better and a 2.5 GPA; or permission of instructor.

MGMT 4440  MANAGEMENT OF QUALITY AND PROCESS IMPROVEMENT (3 credits)

Major topics in this course include TQM, reengineering, process improvement, and tools and techniques to formulate, change and implement these concepts in organizations. Students can develop their knowledge and skills to apply these concepts in organizations through the applied orientation of this course.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MGMT 3490 with a C+ or better and a 2.5 GPA; or permission of instructor.

MGMT 4450  MANAGERIAL NEGOTIATION STRATEGIES (3 credits)

This course introduces students to the theory and practice of negotiation. The ability to negotiate successfully rests on a combination of analytical and interpersonal skills. In this course we will develop a set of conceptual frameworks that should help students better analyze negotiations in general and prepare more effectively for future negotiations in which they may be involved. This course is designed to help students better understand the theories, processes, and practices of negotiation, as well as conflict resolution and relationship management so that students can be more effective negotiators in a wide variety of situations. (Cross-listed with SMCT 4450, BSAD 8456)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MGMT 3490 with a grade of C+ or above, at least a cumulative GPA of 2.5, or permission of instructor.

MGMT 4480  CORPORATE AND BUSINESS STRATEGY (3 credits)

A comprehensive study of the analytical techniques and managerial tasks associated with developing, executing and monitoring a strategic course of action for medium to large firms. The interrelationships between the functional business areas will be stressed using a combination of contemporary readings, business cases, team projects or computerized situations.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Enrollment only with advisor permit. Must have a declared major in BSBA program; 2.5 GPA; completion of 99 or more hours; MGMT 3200, MGMT 3490, MKT 3310, FNBK 3250 with a "C"(2.0) or better. Graduating seniors are given enrollment priority.

MGMT 4500  SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN MANAGEMENT (1-3 credits)

This is an independent study course in which the student completes a focused project in the field of management, human resource management, international business, supply chain management, or entrepreneurship under faculty supervision.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MGMT 3490 C+ or better, 2.5 GPA; permission of program chair; junior/senior standing; must obtain agreement from a faculty member to supervise; submit completed Special Problems contract to MGMT Dept chairperson. Forms in CBA advising office.

MGMT 4510  MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP (1-3 credits)

Students engage in part time employment in the management discipline to gain relevant business experience and to practice the skills and concepts learned in the classroom. Work assignment must encompass duties related to general management or a specialization within the domain (i.e. strategy, production/operations, project management, planning, organizing, leading, or controlling).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MGMT 3490 with a C+ or better, a 2.5 GPA, and junior level standing; and permission of instructor.

MGMT 4520  HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP (1-3 credits)

Students engage in part time employment in the human resource management discipline to gain relevant business experience and to practice the skills and concepts learned in the classroom. Work assignment must encompass duties related to general human resource management or a specialization within the domain (i.e. staffing, training, employee relations).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MGMT 3510 with a C+ or better, a 2.5 GPA, and junior level standing; and permission of instructor.

MGMT 4610  APPLIED LEADERSHIP FOR MANAGERS (3 credits)

The course provides an introduction to applied leadership concepts and practices by providing students with the knowledge and skills necessary to solve problems and make decisions as leaders.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Completion of at least 30 credit hours and a minimum 3.3 GPA. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

Marketing

MKT 2000  SPECIAL TOPICS IN MARKETING (1-5 credits)

The course content and topic will vary. Please contact the CBA for specific course offerings.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ENGL 1160 with grade of 'C' (2.0) or better and 2.3 or better GPA; or permission of instructor.

MKT 2210  SURVEY OF MARKETING (3 credits)

This course is for any student majoring in business. Course content focuses on basic product and service marketing for business and non-business organizations. Additional topics include marketing for career development and marketing for non-profit organizations.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ENGL 1160 with grade of 'C' (2.0) or better and GPA of 2.3 or better.

MKT 3100  PROFESSIONAL SELLING (3 credits)

A course to teach professional selling and relationship marketing principles and practices. A variety of personal and direct sales techniques, psychology and application of personal communication theory will be applied. Use of current sales/marketing research, interactive sales training technology, and systems contracting to professional selling.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ECON 2220 and ENGL 1160 both with 'C' (2.0) or better and GPA of 2.3 or better; or permission of instructor.

MKT 3200  BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS (3 credits)

This course develops business communication skills such as selecting and using appropriate technologies for reaching intended audiences. Students will practice effective explanatory, narrative, persuasive, and investigative writing in the context of business communication.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ENGL 1160 and CMST 1110, each with a grade of "C" (2.0) or better; 2.5 GPA.

MKT 3310  PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING (3 credits)

An examination of marketing functions and the institutions which perform them, choice of criteria for marketing strategy decisions, marketing structural relationships, and the role of marketing in society.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ECON 2200, MATH 1310, ENGL 1160, and MGMT 3200 all with 'C'(2.0) or better, and 2.5 GPA.

MKT 3320  CONSUMER BEHAVIOR (3 credits)

A study of the conceptual and theoretical foundation of consumer and industrial buyer behavior. Emphasis is placed upon the applications in the operational marketplace and research relating to specific consumer problems and patterns in marketing.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MKT 3310 with 'C+' or better; 2.5 GPA or better; or permission of instructor.

MKT 3340  CHANNELS OF DISTRIBUTION (3 credits)

Channels management focuses on the associations of businesses and the performance of required functions making products and services available to end users when and where buyers demand them. Attention is paid to how intermediaries (e.g. wholesalers and retailers) interact and organize an efficient system to ensure that products and services are available in proper quantities and on time for consumers.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MKT 3310 with 'C+' or better; and GPA of 2.5 or better; or permission of instructor.

MKT 3350  MARKETING SERVICE PRODUCTS (3 credits)

This elective explores how intangibility forces customers to evaluate service products differently, creating more challenges for marketers. The course is based on the premise that financial benefits reward services that provide value to customers, and develops strategies for creating value.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MKT 3310 with a 'C+' or better; GPA of 2.5 or better; or permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

MKT 3360  INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS (3 credits)

This course considers the functions and resources necessary to place effective integrated marketing communications (IMC) before target audiences and thus help to achieve marketing objectives for both business and non-business organizations. Specifically, it includes integrated marketing communications institutions, budgeting, positioning, creative strategy, media strategy, and determining communication effectiveness. It also considers social and economic effects of IMC.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MKT 3310 with 'C+' or better and GPA of 2.5 or better; or permission of instructor.

MKT 3370  SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING (3 credits)

The students will become familiar with the full range of promotional media, techniques and methodologies, understand the structuring of a promotional campaign according to the strategic objectives, be able to effectively integrate promotions into a composite marketing program, and be able to design and present a complex promotional strategy employing a diverse array of techniques and methods according to the specific objectives.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Completion of MKT 3310 and MKT 3360 with a C+ or better.

MKT 3380  INTERNATIONAL MARKETING (3 credits)

A study of the processes, procedures, characteristics and environments for goods and services in foreign market places. Reference is drawn to the theories and concepts of domestic marketing to appraise their applicability to international markets. Considerable attention is given to the features of the foreign market environments which both facilitate the marketing processes, inhibit them, and require strategies and tactics of accommodation.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MKT 3310 with 'C+' or better; GPA of 2.5 or better.

MKT 3390  GRAPHIC DESIGN FOR MARKETERS (3 credits)

The course provides a hands-on introduction to the concepts and tools used in graphic design to create marketing communications. Material and assignments will focus on how design supports marketing communication strategy. Students will learn the principles and vocabulary of design, how to critique graphic design, and how to create basic print materials. Students will learn and practice the skills necessary to communicate with graphic designers and advertising professionals in order to successfully implement marketing strategies.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MKT 3310 with 'C+' or better; 2.5 GPA or better.

MKT 3600  BUSINESS ETHICS (3 credits)

Students will learn about the factors, opportunities and pressures that lead to ethical dilemmas, and will develop their understanding of foundations and processes that encourage and reward ethical decision making and behaviors. Lots of examples, sourced from case studies and current events will be provided. (Cross-listed with BSAD 3600, MGMT 3600).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Junior classification (minimum of 58 earned credit hours) with a minimum 2.5 cumulative GPA. Completion of MGMT 3200 with a minimum grade of ''C' (2.0). Not open to non-degree graduate students.

MKT 3610  BUSINESS TO BUSINESS MARKETING (3 credits)

An introductory marketing management course which examines the decisions involved in marketing goods and services to the industrial buyer as opposed to the consumer buyer. Buyer motivation, promotion decisions, channel decisions, product development and pricing policies involved in the marketing of industrial goods are considered.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MKT 3310 with 'C+' or better; GPA of 2.5 or better; or permission of instructor.

MKT 4000  SPECIAL TOPICS IN MARKETING (1-5 credits)

The course content and topic will vary. Please contact the CBA for specific course offerings.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MKT 3310 plus 6 hours of Marketing, all with 'C+' or better; GPA of 2.5 or better; or permission of instructor.

MKT 4100  AVIATION MARKETING (3 credits)

This course will provide an understanding of the principles of marketing and aviation in general. An overview of the marketing relationship with the aviation industry will be explored. This course will introduce students to developing marketing plans and campaigns for aviation related businesses.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): AVN 1000 and MKT 3310 both with a grade of 'C'(2.0) or better and minimum GPA of 2.5.

MKT 4200  CONSULTATIVE SELLING PRINCIPLES (3 credits)

The primary focus of the Consultative Selling Principles course is to develop the behaviors, methodologies, principles, and processes required to successfully lead and manage complex selling initiatives to a win-win close. The course examines and applies, through role playing and other activities, the critical relationship building, critical thinking, problem solving, listening and negotiating capabilities which are the foundation skills underlying consultative selling. (Cross-listed with BSAD 8206)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MKT 3310 with 'C+' or better; MKT 3100 with C+ or better; GPA of 2.5 or better; or permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

MKT 4210  SELLING FINANCIAL SERVICES (3 credits)

Selling Financial Services concentrates on methods to effectively sell services and products in the financial services industry, including the banking, brokerage and insurance sectors. Targeting, initiating, and acquiring client relationships, expanding business opportunities, and maintaining long-term client relationships are the course's focal points. This integrative course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the selling profession and sales culture within the financial services industry. (Cross-listed with BSAD 8216)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MKT 3310 with a C+ or better grade and 2.5 GPA. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

MKT 4220  GLOBAL STRATEGIC ACCOUNT MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

Throughout this course, the management of strategic account programs at national, multi-country, and global levels will be addressed. The primary focus of the curriculum is on the critical success factors for driving revenue, sustainable long term-growth and profitability with a base of core strategic buyers. (Cross-listed with BSAD 8226)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Senior or graduate student standing and permission of the instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

MKT 4300  MARKETING MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

A case study course which examines product, price, promotion and channel of distribution policies. Major emphasis is placed on analysis of marketing problems and the facets of making decisions in the marketing area.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MKT 3310 with grade of 'C+' or better plus 6 hours of marketing, all with 'C' (2.0) or better, senior standing; GPA of 2.5 or better; or permission of instructor.

MKT 4320  SALES MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

Planning, organizing and controlling the sales force. Special emphasis on application of latest research to the areas of compensation, selection, motivation, training, time and territory management, opportunity analysis and cost control. (Cross-listed with BSAD 8326).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MKT 3310 with 'C+' or better; GPA of 2.5 or better; or permission of instructor.

MKT 4340  MARKETING RESEARCH (3 credits)

Application of analytical tools to marketing problems including markets, products, distribution channels, sales efforts and advertising. Emphasis on planning, investigation, collection, interpretation of data and presentation of results.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MKT 3310 with 'C+' or better; BSAD 2130 or BSAD 3140 or BSAD 3160 with 'C' (2.0) or better; GPA of 2.5 or better; or permission of instructor.

MKT 4360  MARKETING IN A HIGH-TECH ENVIRONMENT (3 credits)

The focus of this course is understanding the Internet as a marketing tool. The content includes discussion of how the Internet is used by business for designing products, pricing, promotions, and distribution thereof. The larger impact of the Internet on businesses and future trends is also discussed. (Cross-listed with BSAD 8366).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MKT 3310 with 'C+' or better; GPA of 2.5 or better; or permission of instructor.

MKT 4380  INDUSTRIAL PURCHASING AND LOGISTICS MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

This course will focus on the strategic procurement of products and services in order to gain a competitive advantage through integrated supply management. Students will learn about strategic supply management, contract negotiation, and supplier quality management. Students will develop an understanding of supplier performance management through the use of supply chain information systems. (Cross-listed with SCMT 4380, BSAD 8386.)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): SCMT 3410; GPA of 2.5 or better; or by permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

MKT 4420  BUSINESS DEMOGRAPHICS (3 credits)

The development of a demographic perspective to assist in understanding the business environment and business policy. How population change impacts upon consumer markets and all of the functions (for example, accounting, finance and management) that must exist for these markets to perform. Includes a history of U.S. population change and policy as well as a view toward international population considerations.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MKT 3310 with 'C+' or better; GPA 2.5 or better, Junior Standing; or permission of instructor.

MKT 4500  SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN MARKETING (2-3 credits)

Individual investigation of specific problems in marketing. (Fall, Spring)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Senior and permission of instructor.

MKT 4510  MARKETING INTERNSHIP (1-3 credits)

Students engage in part time employment in the marketing discipline to gain relevant business experience and to practice the skills and concepts learned in the classroom. Work assignment must encompass duties related to general marketing or a specialization within the domain (i.e. selling, social media, advertising, market research).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MKT 3310 with a C+ or better, a 2.5 GPA, and junior level standing; and permission of instructor.

MKT 4540  SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP (1-3 credits)

Students engage in part-time employment in supply chain management to gain relevant business experience and to practice the skills and concepts learned in the classroom. Work assignment must encompass duties related to the field of supply chain management (i.e., purchasing, scheduling, supplier relations, materials management, or logistics). (Cross-listed with SCMT 4540)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): SCMT 3410 and GPA of 2.5 or better; or by permission of the instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

MKT 4760  SELLING IN AN ENTREPRENEURIAL CONTEXT (3 credits)

Successful entrepreneurs are able to identify unmet needs in the marketplace and then design and sell products or services that fulfill those needs. Sales effectiveness is essential for entrepreneurs because they must be able to build sustainable sales pipelines that ensure profitable growth as other pressing issues such as financing, staffing, product development are addressed. This course will focus on consultative solution-based sales fundamentals that can be applied in the entrepreneurial selling environment. (Cross-listed with ENTR 4760, BSAD 8766)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): GPA 2.5 or better; MKT 3100 with a 2.5 grade or better; MKT 3310 with a 2.5 grade or better; or permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

MKT 4800  HONORS STUDIES IN MARKETING (3 credits)

A comprehensive examination of marketing as it is practiced among firms representing different industrial sectors. Course objectives include individual inquiry, theoretical applications and limitations, and an increased academic understanding of the discipline of marketing. Only grades 'B' and above will be awarded. Students exhibiting performance below the 'B' level will receive an 'F' for the course. Admission to this course is by invitation only.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Permission of instructor. Senior standing, 3.2 GPA or above, declared business college specialization in MKT or BFIN or MGMT or communications ( journalism, PR or broadcasting). Not open to non-degree graduate students.

MKT 4910  SPECIAL TOPICS IN MARKETING (3 credits)

A series of special courses each designed to focus on current major topics and developments in a specific area of marketing or business. Scheduled as a workshop or seminar according to purpose.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Senior standing or permission of instructor.

Real Estate & Land Use Economics

RELU 2000  SPECIAL TOPICS IN REAL ESTATE AND LAND USE ECONOMICS (1-5 credits)

The course content and topic will vary. Please contact CBA for specific offerings.

RELU 2410  REAL ESTATE PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES (3 credits)

An introductory survey of real estate principles and practices which introduces the terminology, concepts and basic practices in the fields of real estate law, real estate finance, real estate appraisal, real estate property taxation and miscellaneous topic areas. Note: Students cannot receive credit for both RELU 2410 and RELU 3410. (Fall, Spring)

RELU 3410  REAL ESTATE CONCEPTS AND PROCESSES (3 credits)

A survey course for business students introducing theory and practice applicable to real estate markets. (Fall, Spring)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Junior.

RELU 3420  BUILDING INDUSTRY AND REAL ESTATE (3 credits)

Site planning, orientation and design of buildings with emphasis on residential building; introduction to architectural styles, building materials, methods, techniques and processes, preparation of working plans and specifications. (Spring)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): RELU 2410 or RELU 3410.

RELU 3430  REAL ESTATE BROKERAGE AND SALES (3 credits)

The basic principles of the real estate brokerage and sales business, such as brokerage business operation, legal environment and understanding contracts and closing statements. (Spring)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): RELU 2410 or RELU 3410.

RELU 3450  REAL ESTATE MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

Commercial and residential property management fundamentals, including leasing space, tenant selection and relations, maintenance and investor relations. (Fall)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): RELU 2410 or RELU 3410.

RELU 3460  REAL ESTATE LAW (3 credits)

This course is concerned with the sources of real estate law, both cases and statutes, and covers estates in land, conveyances, leases, mortgages, easements, zoning, brokers, contracts, taxes, foreclosures and open occupancy (Fall, Spring) . (Cross-listed with LAWS 3460)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): RELU 2410 or RELU 3410.

RELU 3470  METROPOLIS CONFLICTS AND HOUSING PROBLEMS (3 credits)

Urban value conflicts, urbanization, transportation and land use, the environment, the property tax base. Housing: needs, goals, housing markets, government housing programs. Housing and community development. (Fall)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): RELU 2410 or RELU 3410.

RELU 3480  CITY PLANNING (3 credits)

Cities: ancient, classic, medieval, industrial, commercial. Planning process: general plan, zoning, circulation, neighborhood unit, commercial. Urban renewal: new regional distribution of settlements; dynamic planning for change. (Spring)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): RELU 2410 or RELU 3410.

RELU 4000  SPECIAL TOPICS IN REAL ESTATE AND LAND USE ECONOMICS (1-5 credits)

The course content and topic will vary. Please contact the CBA for specific course offerings.

RELU 4390  REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS (3 credits)

Methods used to analyze existing commercial real estate investments through traditional, as well as more technical, dynamic programming models.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): RELU 2410 and FNBK 3250

RELU 4400  RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE FINANCE (3 credits)

Methods of financing residential real estate, analysis of mortgage risks, mortgage instruments, mortgage lenders, financial calculations, influences of governmental agencies. (Fall, Spring)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): RELU 2410 and junior standing.

RELU 4410  BASIC APPRAISAL PROCEDURES (3 credits)

Fundamentals of real estate valuation and appraising; factors affecting value; valuing land, valuing improvements and the valuation of special classes of residential property; appraisal practice, depreciation and obsolescence, appraising rules, the mathematics of appraising; an appraisal of a single family residence is required.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): RELU 2410 or RELU 3410 AND FNBK 3250 with a C or better

RELU 4420  INCOME PROPERTY APPRAISAL (3 credits)

Introduction to the theory and concepts of income capitalization approaches, methods and techniques to valuation of real estate income property. Characteristics of yield on investment real estate; future income projections; mortgage coefficients; purchase and leaseback reversions; Ellwood Tables; capitalization rates and investment yields; types of annuities; and condemnation appraisal. (Spring)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): RELU 2410 or RELU 3410; and FNBK 3250

RELU 4430  REAL ESTATE ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS (3 credits)

Survey of environmental problems, air pollution, man's structural changes; environmental policy analysis and controls and their effect on real estate markets; legislation and regulatory structures; land use problems and environmental impact statements. (Fall)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): RELU 2410 or RELU 3410.

RELU 4440  CREATING A REAL ESTATE COMMUNITY (3 credits)

Market analysis and planning for land developments for various types of uses: residential, campus, civic centers, housing for the elderly, urban renewal, shopping centers.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): RELU 2410 or RELU 3410.

RELU 4450  URBAN REAL ESTATE LABORATORY (2 credits)

On-site analysis of history, economics, design and profitability status on local low-, medium-, and high-income housing, both single and multiple family. Public housing and housing for the aged. Shopping centers, industrial parks, central business district and recreational real estate. Planning board and city council zoning change hearings, county recorder, assessor, treasurer offices.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): RELU 2410 or RELU 3410.

RELU 4460  COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE FINANCE (3 credits)

A foundation course in commercial real estate finance including legal, analytical, institutional and governmental aspects.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): RELU 2410 and FNBK 3250

RELU 4500  SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN REAL ESTATE AND LAND USE ECONOMICS (1-3 credits)

Individual investigation of specific problems in real estate and land use economics.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Senior and permission of program chair.

RELU 4510  REAL ESTATE INTERNSHIP (1-3 credits)

Correlation of theory and practice through part-time employment and weekly seminars; required readings. (Maximum of 4 hours).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Permission of program chair or internship coordinator.

Supply Chain Management

SCMT 2000  SURVEY OF SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

The principles and methods involved in supply chain management with emphasis on creating customer value. This course makes extensive use of company tours, plant visits and industry professionals to introduce students to the global dimensions of supply chain management and related disciplines such as IT, HR management, marketing, transportation, logistics, operations management, project management and production scheduling.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Sophomore standing and 2.33 GPA. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

SCMT 3000  MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING FOR SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

This course highlights the important role of a managerial accountant in managing a global supply chain and covers the key accounting techniques for supply chain management. (Cross-listed with ACCT 3000)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ACCT 2020 with a grade of C (2.0) or better or ACCT 2000 with a grade of C (2.0) or better and cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

SCMT 3410  SUSTAINABLE SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

Sustainable supply chain management is the design and management of business processes within and across organizational boundaries to meet the needs of the end customer. The overall goal of this course is to provide students with an understanding of present day issues and policies related to establishing a sustainable, competitive advantage through efficient use of resources and collaboration with external business partners. Students will develop critical thinking skills focused on business process analysis and the use of key performance indicators.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Sophomore standing; GPA of 2.5 or better; or by permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

SCMT 3500  OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

The course is designed to introduce students to strategic, tactical, and control decisions in manufacturing and service operations. Students will learn how operations integrate all other business processes for competitive advantage. It covers current applications of quality concepts, business process reengineering, supply-chain management, lean systems, and ERP systems for business operations efficiency and effectiveness.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): BSAD 2130 or BSAD 3160, and MGMT 3200 with 'C' (2.0) or better and 2.5 GPA.

SCMT 4160  INTRODUCTION TO ENTERPRISE RESOURCE PLANNING (3 credits)

Introduction to Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) is designed to expose students to the primary enterprise application that forms the information systems (IS) infrastructure for most large organizations today. The primary purpose of this course is for students to gain an understanding of the enterprise wide, cross-functional nature of ERP software. In the process of learning about ERP systems, the students develop "hands on" experience with the largest and most well-known ERP application, SAP. (Cross-listed with ISQA 4160, ISQA 8166)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): CIST 2100 or equivalent. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

SCMT 4330  PROJECT MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

This course will focus on the planning and execution of complex projects within an organization. Students will learn how to conduct stakeholder analysis, plan the scope of a project, develop a project budget, lead a project team, and define the steps necessary to bring a complex project to a successful conclusion. Students will recognize how the strategy, structure, and culture of an organization can be used to identify and prioritize complex projects. (Cross-listed with MGMT 4330, BSAD 8336)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MGMT3490 with a C+ or better and a 2.5 GPA; or permission of the instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

SCMT 4350  GLOBAL SOURCING AND INNOVATION (3 credits)

This course will focus on global suppliers as partners in the development and commercialization of new products. Students will learn about open innovation and the integration of internal and external business systems focused on new product innovation. Students will develop an understanding of regulatory policies related to information sharing and the intellectual property rights of buyers and suppliers. (Cross-listed with BSAD 8356)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): SCMT 3410; GPA of 2.5 or better; or by permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

SCMT 4370  SUPPLY CHAIN ANALYTICS (3 credits)

This course focuses on the integration of supply chain management through the use of key performance indicators. Key concepts in this course include data visualization, supplier performance metrics, service-dominant logic, and the supply chain for data. Specific topics include the influence of the empowered customer on supply chain metrics, using metrics to develop a competitive advantage, data-driven decision making, and the four stages of actionable intelligence. (Cross-listed with BSAD 8376)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MGMT 3490 with a grade of C+ or above, at least a cumulative GPA of 2.5, or permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

SCMT 4380  INDUSTRIAL PURCHASING AND LOGISTICS MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

This course will focus on the strategic procurement of products and services in order to gain a competitive advantage through integrated supply management. Students will learn about strategic supply management, contract negotiation, and supplier quality management. Students will develop an understanding of supplier performance management through the use of supply chain information systems. (Cross-listed with MKT 4380, BSAD 8386)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): SCMT 3410; GPA of 2.5 or better; or by permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

SCMT 4450  MANAGERIAL NEGOTIATION STRATEGIES (3 credits)

This course introduces students to the theory and practice of negotiation. The ability to negotiate successfully rests on a combination of analytical and interpersonal skills. In this course we will develop a set of conceptual frameworks that should help students better analyze negotiations in general and prepare more effectively for future negotiations in which they may be involved. This course is designed to help students better understand the theories, processes, and practices of negotiation, as well as conflict resolution and relationship management so that students can be more effective negotiators in a wide variety of situations. (Cross-listed with MGMT 4450, BSAD 8456)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MGMT 3490 with a grade of C+ or above, at least a cumulative GPA of 2.5, or permission of instructor.

SCMT 4540  SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP (1-3 credits)

Students engage in part-time employment in supply chain management to gain relevant business experience and to practice the skills and concepts learned in the classroom. Work assignment must encompass duties related to the field of supply chain management (i.e., purchasing, scheduling, supplier relations, materials management, or logistics).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): SCMT 3410 and GPA of 2.5 or better; or by permission of the instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.