Economics

Degree Programs Offered

ECON 8010  SEMINAR PUBLIC FINANCE (3 credits)

This course is designed to develop the tools of applied welfare economics and to use these tools to evaluate the expenditure and tax decisions of governments. The structure, effects and reform of the U.S. individual and corporate income taxes will be emphasized.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ECON 3200 or ECON 8210 or BSAD 8100 or permission

ECON 8020  ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS AND MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

This course covers topics related to environmental economics and policy, with an emphasis on comparative policy analysis and business strategies towards the environment. (Cross-listed with BSAD 8020).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ECON 2200 and ECON 2220 or BSAD 8180, or permission of the instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

ECON 8050  ECONOMIC EDUCATION (3 credits)

A study and examination of economic principles and how they can be related to the teacher's classroom presentation. This course is designed to furnish the public school teacher (K-12) with sufficient background and understanding to aid in the recognition of economic issues and the teaching of economic concepts and principles.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): No previous course work in economics. Not open to Economics majors.

ECON 8160  SEMINAR IN LABOR ECONOMICS (3 credits)

A study of the demand for labor, the supply of labor, the theory of compensating differentials, investment in human capital, worker mobility, discrimination, unions, inequality and unemployment.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ECON 3200 or ECON 8210 or BSAD 8100 or permission.

ECON 8200  SEMINAR IN MICRO THEORY (3 credits)

This course deals with the current state of microeconomic theory. The major topics covered are the theory of consumer behavior, theory of production and cost, theory of the firm, distribution theory and welfare theory.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ECON 3200, ECON 3220 and ECON 8306 or permission.

ECON 8210  MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS (3 credits)

Microeconomics for graduate students of business. Economic analysis of the business firm and its environments, with emphasis on market structure, production possibilities and cost factors. Additional consideration is given to the theory of the firm under conditions of uncertainty. (Cross-listed with BSAD 8100).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate student in economics and ECON 2200 or equivalent.

ECON 8216  INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION (3 credits)

This course applies economic analysis to public policy issues in industrial economics. It is concerned with the strategic behavior of firms: the nature of interaction among competing firms within a game-theory framework. Among the topics covered are: discriminatory pricing, predatory conduct, product design, patent infringement, price wars, location decisions, and entry-deterrence. (Cross-listed with ECON 4210).

ECON 8220  SEMINAR IN MACRO THEORY (3 credits)

This course traces the development of macroeconomic theory from the classical point of view to current schools of thought. Keynesian, neo-Keynesian and neo-classical models are developed.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ECON 3200 or ECON 8210 or BSAD 8100, ECON 3220, and ECON 8306, or permission.

ECON 8230  BUSINESS CONDITIONS ANALYSIS (3 credits)

This course is concerned with the statistical measurement and evaluation of general business conditions, and the adaptation of business policies to changing business conditions. Emphasis is placed upon the practical application of statistical techniques of analysis to the business situation, within the framework of the aggregate economy.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ECON 2200 or BSAD 8180.

ECON 8266  HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT (3 credits)

The first half of the course focuses on the development of economics from Adam Smith in 1776 to John Maynard Keynes in the 1930s. The second half of the course uses the history sketched in the first half as a partial basis for addressing important questions about the methodology, institutional structure and policy impact of economics. (Cross-listed with ECON 4260).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ECON 2200 and ECON 2220, or BSAD 8180, or equivalent.

ECON 8290  RESEARCH METHODS IN ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS (3 credits)

Covers the methodology of economics: choosing a research topic, literature search tools, data source identification, data summary techniques, basic statistical data analysis using statistical packages, and clear economics writing. The student will become familiar with these techniques through text materials, journal studies, and completion of an empirical economics paper.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ECON 3200, ECON 3220, or equivalents, or permission of the instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

ECON 8300  ECONOMETRICS (3 credits)

The study of the underlying assumptions, techniques and applications of single and multiple equation regression analysis in economics.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Basic Statistics, ECON 8306/ECON 4300 and ECON 8290/ECON 4290, or permission. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

ECON 8306  QUANTITATIVE APPLICATIONS IN ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS (3 credits)

The study and application of modern quantitative techniques to problem-solving in economics and business. (Cross-listed with ECON 4300).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ECON 2200 and ECON 2220, or BSAD 8180.

ECON 8310  BUSINESS FORECASTING (3 credits)

This course includes a comprehensive survey of forecasting methods and in-depth study of selected techniques most commonly used in business environments. Emphasis is given to applications and therefore students will be required to develop forecasting models and test their performance as part of the course. (Cross-listed with BSAD 8080).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): BSAD 8000 or equivalent or ECON 8300 or permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

ECON 8320  TOOLS FOR DATA ANALYSIS (3 credits)

The course will cover basic principles of programming languages, as well as libraries useful in collecting, cleaning and analyzing data to answer research questions. The course will utilize basic Economic principles and Econometric methods as inspiration for assignments and projects throughout the duration of the course, and will do so in a way that is accessible to non-Economists. This course is intended to introduce the student to the Python programming language as a tool for conducting data analysis. While the course uses Python, the student should be able to move to other languages frequently used in data analysis using the principles taught in this course.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ECON 2200 or BSAD 8150 (or equivalent); BSAD 2130 or equivalent; or instructor approval.

ECON 8326  NATURAL RESOURCE ECONOMICS (3 credits)

Energy, minerals, fisheries, water, land, pollution and congestion are among the topics. The course covers the basic theoretical framework for understanding the optimal rate of resource use, identifies the factors which determine the actual rate of use, and considers and evaluates various public policy prescriptions. (Cross-listed with ECON 4320).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ECON 2200 and ECON 2220, or BSAD 8180, or permission of instructor.

ECON 8330  DATA ANALYSIS FROM SCRATCH (3 credits)

Econometrics is routinely taught as an application class ¿ using a `black box¿ like Stata or SAS to perform calculations. This class takes a different approach. Using the Python programming language, we build all estimators from scratch. Additionally, we introduce numerous non-parametric and simulation techniques. This approach to econometrics results in a stronger understanding of statistical assumptions and methods, a better understanding of when a method is appropriate, and stronger programming techniques. Furthermore, a deeper understanding of the underlying mechanics provides the student the ability to program custom procedures not already built into popular software packages.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): A multivariate or regression analysis course such as ECON 8300, ISQA 9130 or STAT 8436, and a programming class such as ECON 8320 or equivalent programming experience; or instructor approval. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

ECON 8346  ECONOMICS OF TECHNOLOGY (3 credits)

The seminar discusses whether innovation is more driven by demand or supply forces, the optimal timing of adoption of new technology, whether new technology benefits workers and consumers, and whether government is successful at supporting promising new technology. (Cross listed with ECON 4340).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ECON 2200 or BSAD 8180 or permission of the instructor.

ECON 8450  SEMINAR IN MONEY & BANKING (3 credits)

Original research and writing of papers on basic problems in the area of money and banking.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Six hours in undergraduate monetary courses or permission of the instructor.

ECON 8456  MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY (3 credits)

Monetary policy has an important effect on economic magnitudes, including the level of output, interest rates, inflation rates, exchange rates, and many other variables. This course provides an in-depth analysis of the role that the Federal Reserve plays in our economy. This involves how monetary policy is transmitted to various markets. (Cross-listed with ECON 4450).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ECON 3220, or permission of the instructor.

ECON 8566  STATE AND LOCAL FINANCE (3 credits)

Theoretical and policy analysis of state and local government fiscal behavior. Revenues, expenditures, borrowing, and intergovernmental fiscal relations. Applications to education, transportation, and economic development. (Cross-listed with ECON 4560).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ECON 2200 and ECON 2220, or BSAD 8180, or equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

ECON 8600  HEALTH ECONOMICS (3 credits)

This course is designed to help students understand how the theories and models of economics can be applied to the study of health and health care. The examination of the markets (demand and supply) for health, health care and health insurance is stressed. In addition, the economic analytic tools such as microeconomic theories and economic evaluation methods also will be reviewed and introduced. The objective of this course is to equip students with the knowledge tools to examine and analyze the problems issues of health care from the perspective of economics.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ECON 2200 or equivalent.

ECON 8616  INTERNATIONAL TRADE (3 credits)

An analysis of the character of international economic relations. Subjects covered include the economic basis for international specialization and trade, the economic gains from trade, commercial policy, economic integration and economic growth. (Cross-listed with ECON 4610).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ECON 2200 and ECON 2220, or BSAD 8180, or permission of instructor.

ECON 8626  INTERNATIONAL MONETARY ECONOMICS (3 credits)

An analysis of the international monetary system. Subjects covered include the balance of payments adjustment mechanism, alternative exchange rate systems, external effects of monetary and fiscal policy, foreign investments and international monetary reform. (Cross-listed with ECON 4620).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ECON 2200 and ECON 2220, or BSAD 8180, or permission of instructor.

ECON 8650  SEMINAR IN INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS (3 credits)

An analysis of the theory of international trade and the working of the international monetary system.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ECON 3600 or ECON 4660 or permission of instructor.

ECON 8666  INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (3 credits)

Problems relating to early stages of economic development; investment priorities, mobilizing savings and policies and programs are studied. (Cross-listed with ECON 4660).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ECON 2200 and ECON 2220, or BSAD 8180, or permission of instructor.

ECON 8706  ECONOMICS OF EBUSINESS (3 credits)

The course will be conducted mainly as a seminar with ample student participation, including a research paper. A "New Economy" has often been identified with the rise of e-business. We will examine whether the rise of e-business has brought with it a change in the rules of the economy, and we will look at the effects of e-business on business, labor, consumers, and the stock market. (Cross-listed with ECON 8706, BSAD 8706).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Admission to the MBA program or the Economics graduate program or permission of the instructor.

ECON 8736  ECONOMICS OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP (3 credits)

This course will review economic theories of entrepreneurship with special emphasis on Schumpeter's theory of creative destruction. The main focus of the seminar will be on the "high-level" entrepreneurship that sometimes results in major innovations. This course will address the societal benefits of entrepreneurship, factors influencing entrepreneurial success, the policies that best encourage entrepreneurship, and how firms can survive and prosper in an entrepreneurial environment. (Cross-listed with ECON 4730, BSAD 8736.)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ECON 2200 or permission of the instructor for all students.

ECON 8850  SEMINAR IN URBAN ECONOMICS (3 credits)

An examination of the theoretical basis for the analysis of urban economic problems with emphasis upon the policy alternatives applicable toward their possible solution.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): At least six hours of upper division course work in economics or permission of the instructor.

ECON 8856  ECONOMICS OF URBAN AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT (3 credits)

This course will consider factors and trends in development at the global and national level but will focus primarily on economic development at the state, local, and regional levels in the United States. The focus of this course will be real world strategic planning for economic development. (Cross-listed with ECON 4850).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MATH 1310 or MATH 1220, ECON 2200 and ECON 2220, each with a "C" (2.0) or better, or permission of instructor.

ECON 8870  SEMINAR IN REGIONAL ECONOMICS (3 credits)

An examination of the current developments and issues involving regional economic development and planning. These courses provide the theoretical basis for understanding and analyzing economic problems of a regional nature. In addition, policy alternatives, decision-making and measurement techniques are examined.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): At least six hours of upper division course work in economics or permission of instructor.

ECON 8910  SPECIAL STUDIES IN ECONOMICS (1-3 credits)

(May be repeated up to 6) A series of special courses, each designed to focus on current major issues and developments in a specific area of economics or business, scheduled as a workshop or seminar according to purpose.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate student in good standing and as indicated for specific workshop or seminar.

ECON 8916  SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS (1-3 credits)

(May be repeated up to 6 hours) A series of special courses each designed to focus on current major topics and developments in a specific area of economics or business, scheduled as a workshop or seminar according to purpose. (Cross-listed with BSAD 8916, ECON 4910).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate student in good standing or advanced undergraduate student and as indicated for specific workshop or seminar.

ECON 8920  INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3 credits)

Guided independent study and research under tutorial supervision.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate student in economics and permission of instructor.

ECON 8930  INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3 credits)

Guided independent study and research under tutorial supervision.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate student in economics and permission of instructor.

ECON 8940  ECONOMIC INTERNSHIP (1-3 credits)

Guided internship in a firm or organization that makes use of, or extends, the student's skill in economics.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Completion of at least nine hours of graduate level economics and permission of instructor.

ECON 8990  THESIS (1-6 credits)

An independent research project, written under the supervision of a graduate adviser in the department of economics. Approval of the topic and the completed project by departmental committee is required.