Psychology (PSYC)

PSYC 8000  THE PROFESSION OF PSYCHOLOGY (0 credits)

Required non-credit course for graduate students in psychology. Intended to familiarize the beginning graduate student with the profession of psychology including such topics as ethics, professional organizations, job and educational opportunities, use of reference materials, licensing and certification and other relevant material.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 8016  HISTORY OF PSYCHOLOGY (3 credits)

A study of the origins, development and nature of psychology and its relation to external events; emphasis on the period since 1875. (Cross-listed with PSYC 4010)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Admission to graduate program in Psychology or permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree students or students in other departments or programs.

PSYC 8060  COMPUTER CONCEPTS IN PSYCHOLOGY AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES (3 credits)

Introductory course emphasizing the applications of computers in the areas of psychology, sociology and education. Includes a functional description of computers and a discussion of programming languages as well as specific uses.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 3130 or equivalent. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 8116  POLITICAL PSYCHOLOGY (3 credits)

This course introduces students to the role of human thought, emotion, and behavior in politics through examination of the psychological factors that motivate political elites and the mass public. (Cross-listed with PSCI 4110, PSCI 8116, PSYC 4110)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSCI 1100 is recommended.

PSYC 8140  NONPARAMETRIC STATISTICS (3 credits)

Study of distribution-free statistics with particular emphasis on application of distribution-free tests to research problems in social behavioral sciences.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 3130 or equivalent. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 8250  FAMILY ANALYSIS AND TREATMENT (3 credits)

This courses covers theories and techniques for family therapy, with special reference to adapting individual and group therapeutic, as well as consultation, principles for family interventions. Case analyses and evaluation methods are considered.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Admission to School Psychology Graduate Program and/or permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 8256  LIMITS OF CONSCIOUSNESS (3 credits)

A course focusing on the scientific study of the psychology, neurology, and philosophy of mind. This course is designed for students who are interested in thinking about thinking. (Cross-listed with PSYC 4250, PHIL 3250)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1010. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 8276  ANIMAL BEHAVIOR (3 credits)

Behavior of diverse animals for the understanding of the relationships between nervous integration and the behavior manifested by the organism, as well as the evolution and adaptive significance of behavior as a functional unit. Lecture only.(Cross-listed with PSYC 4270, BIOL 4270, BIOL 8276)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): BIOL 1750 and PSYC 1010 or permission of instructor, junior-senior.

PSYC 8286  ANIMAL BEHAVIOR LABORATORY (3 credits)

Laboratory and field studies of animal behavior with an ethological emphasis. Classical laboratory experiences and independent studies will be conducted. (Cross-listed with PSYC 4280, BIOL 4280, BIOL 8286)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 4270 or BIOL 4270 or PSYC 8276 or BIOL 8273 and not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 8316  PSYCHOLOGICAL AND EDUCATIONAL TESTING (3 credits)

The use of standardized tests in psychology and education is considered with special regard to their construction, reliability and validity. (Cross-listed with PSYC 4310)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1010 and junior/senior and not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 8326  HORMONES & BEHAVIOR (3 credits)

In this course, students will examine the interaction between hormones, chemical messengers released from endocrine glands, and behavior in both human and animal systems. Methods for studying hormonal issues on behavior will be addressed. This course will provide students in psychology, biology, and related disciplines an understanding of how hormones affect sensory processing, motor activities, and processing of information in the central nervous system. (Cross-listed with PSYC 4320, BIOL 4320, BIOL 8326)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Must be admitted to a graduate level PSYC program or permission of department.. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 8336  SOCIAL NEUROSCIENCE (3 credits)

This course will evaluate the biological substrates of sociality and social behavior, and explore the impact of social environments on brain function and development. Students in the course will explore the molecular, cellular, neurotransmitter, and endocrine influences on social behavior, including affiliative care, aggression, social bonding, altruism, and social cognition. (Cross-listed with NEUR 4330)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1010, BIOL 1450, and NEUR 1500. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 8446  ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY (3 credits)

A course designed to examine the aberrant behavior of individuals. Symptoms, dynamics, therapy and prognosis of syndromes are considered. (Cross-listed with PSYC 4440)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1010. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 8456  PERSONALITY THEORIES (3 credits)

A comparative approach to the understanding and appreciation of personality theories considering history, assertions, applications, validations and prospects. (Cross-listed with PSYC 4450)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 8476  MENTAL HEALTH AND AGING (3 credits)

The goal of this course is to survey the mental health needs of older adults. Consideration is given to identifying both positive mental health and pathological conditions. Treatment interventions effective with older adults and their families also are discussed. (Cross-listed with PSYC 4470, GERO 4470, GERO 8476)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Junior or senior.

PSYC 8500  PROFESSIONAL, LEGAL, AND ETHICAL FOUNDATIONS OF SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY (3 credits)

This course covers the role description and job activities of a school psychologist, as well as theories, assessment and intervention techniques, certification requirements, employment opportunities, public policy, legislation, and ethics relevant to school psychology. School-based field experiences will also be included in the course.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Must be admitted to a graduate level PSYC program or permission of dept. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 8520  FOUNDATIONS OF ASSESSMENT (3 credits)

Course content covers traditional psychometric concepts (e.g., norms, reliability, validity) and their application to various areas of human behavior that are assessed (e.g., cognitive ability, personality, achievement). Clinical considerations are applied to how assessment information is integrated into a problem-solving process.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Admission to School Psychology Graduate Program and/or permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 8526  PSYCHOLINGUISTICS (3 credits)

A discussion of the literature concerned with how such psychological variables as perception, learning, memory and development relate to the linguistic variables of sentence structure, meaning and speech sounds. (Cross-listed with PSYC 4520)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Permission of instructor and not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 8530  EARLY CHILDHOOD ASSESSMENT (3 credits)

This course is an introduction to the assessment of children during early development including infancy, toddler, preschool and early primary ages. Assessment will be discussed as it relates to problem-solving and data-based decision making (i.e., diagnosis, treatment, program evaluation). Students will learn the principles of working with young children and their families and how these principles will be used in conducting valid and reliable assessments that, in turn, lead to appropriate interventions.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Admission to School Psychology Graduate Program and/or permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 8536  CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY (3 credits)

This course will provide an overview of the cultural, community and ecological factors that play a role in how people perceive their environments. The goal is to investigate the ways in which culture affects individual behaviors, attitudes and cognitions. It may be easy to tell that two cultures are different, but identifying exactly what is meant - and all that is encompassed - when speaking about "culture" can be much more difficult. Culture can include everything from gender constructs and race/ethnicity to the effects of new technologies. All of these aspects of culture affect individuals' psychological make-up and behavior. Although psychology has largely developed from a Western tradition, attention to research from non-Western perspectives will also be emphasized. This course supports the Cultural and Global Analysis concentration in the Master of Arts in Critical and Creative Thinking. (Cross-listed with PSYC 4530, CACT 8106).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Enrollment in MA in Critical & Creative Thinking program or by permission of the instructor.

PSYC 8540  SCHOOL AGE ASSESSMENT (3 credits)

This course covers data-based decision-making as it applies to schools. Students will learn and practice the skills of reviewing records, interviewing, systematically observing, and testing. They will be exposed to the following types of assessments: academic, behavior, curriculum-based, intellectual, social-emotional, and screening measures.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Admission to School Psychology Graduate Program and/or permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 8550  PSYCHOTHERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS (3 credits)

This course provides graduate students knowledge in the application of evidence-based therapeutic interventions that can be utilized with children and adolescents in school, home, and family settings. Various approaches and techniques are presented along with supporting research. Observation and participation in clinical cases may be arranged.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Admission to School Psychology Graduate Program and/or permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 8576  BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS AND INTERVENTIONS (3 credits)

Introduction to experimental methodology, rationale and research literature of changing behavior through behavior modification techniques. Particular attention will be paid to methodological concerns regarding single subject design, ethical considerations and ramifications of behavior intervention with children and youth. (Cross-listed with PSYC 4570)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Admission to School Psychology Graduate Program and/or permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 8590  PSYCHOLOGY OF EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN (3 credits)

The content of this course will focus on children who are identified as "exceptional"; in terms of behavioral, cognitive, and learning problems. Exceptionality in this sense includes students who are in need of preventative and/or intervention-based services. The topics will be approached from a multidisciplinary perspective and emphasis will be placed on utilizing a response to intervention approach in working with exceptional individuals. The service-learning component of the course will require students to learn about the educational environment by spending time in an elementary classroom, consulting with school staff and addressing the educational needs of students.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Admission to School Psychology Graduate Program and/or permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 8616  HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING (3 credits)

Based on knowledge of human strengths and limitations, this course will provide an overview of how basic principles of human factors can be utilized to reduce error, increase productivity, and enhance safety, comfort, and health. Applications to real-world equipment design, task design, environmental design, selection and training will be included. (Cross-listed with PSYC 4610)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1010 or permission of instructor, not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 8636  ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (3 credits)

This is a survey course which will cover the major concepts, theories and empirical research related to organizational psychology. Specific topics will include: work motivation, leadership, decision making and job satisfaction as well as more recent trends such as cultural diversity, work teams, work-family and quality issues. (Cross-listed with PSYC 4630)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Admission to a graduate program or graduate certificate program. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 8646  PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY (3 credits)

A survey of psychological principles, theories and research related to personnel issues. Course includes discussion of personnel selection, performance appraisal, recruitment, training and health and safety. (Cross-listed with PSYC 4640)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Admission to a graduate program or graduate certificate program, not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 8656  CREATIVITY AND INNOVATION IN ORGANIZATIONS (3 credits)

To provide a discussion of the antecedents of individual and organizational creativity, including measurement, models, characteristics of the individual and the environment that facilitate creativity and innovation in an organizational setting. Students in this course will be able to understand the research literature related to creativity and innovation and apply the findings to improve critical and creative thinking, implementation of creative ideas, and development of creative teams and organizations. This course supports the Organizational Science and Leadership concentration in the Master of Arts in Critical and Creative Thinking. (Cross-listed with PSYC 4650, CACT 8506)

PSYC 8700  ETHICS AND LAW FOR PSYCHOLOGY AND APPLIED BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS (3 credits)

This course provides graduate students with advanced knowledge of ethical codes, legal statutes, and case law that guide the profession of psychology and related applied fields with particular attention to the practice of applied behavior analysis. The primary emphasis of the class is on clinic-, community-, and school-based practice with children and adolescents.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Must be admitted to a graduate level PSYC program or permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 8800  GRADUATE SEMINAR IN THE AGING BRAIN (3 credits)

The Graduate Seminar in the Aging Brain is a graduate level gerontology course focused on understanding the changes to the brain due to normal aging and aging-related diseases. This is an elective course for the Gerontology graduate program at UNO. The content matter of this course also makes it a relevant fit for graduate students from disciplines such as biology, psychology, geriatric medicine, nursing, social work, and exercise science. By the end of the course, students should have a thorough understanding of the changes to the brain in healthy aging and aging-related disease that affect cognitive and emotional functioning. (Cross-listed with GERO 8800).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate level standing

PSYC 8806  LAW & PSYCHOLOGY: ETHICS, RESEARCH & SERVICE (3 credits)

This course presents legal principles relevant to all psychological specialties, with special reference to mental health services. Ethical reasoning and the APA ethics code are considered. (Cross-listed with PSYC 4800)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Must be admitted to a graduate level PSYC program or permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 8896  GENES, BRAIN, AND BEHAVIOR (3 credits)

This course will evaluate the complex interaction between an organism's genome and neural activity pattern in the nervous system as related to behavior. In this course students will explore how changes in gene expression (allelic variants, epigenetics, differential regulation) and gene networks within neural tissue can reciprocally influence behaviors such as communication, foraging, reproduction, and cognition. (Cross-listed with NEUR 4890, BIOL 4890, BIOL 8896)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 8900  PROBLEMS IN PSYCHOLOGY (1-6 credits)

A faculty-supervised research project, involving empirical or library work and oral or written reports.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Written permission of department. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 8950  PRACTICUM FOR MASTER'S STUDENTS (1-6 credits)

Faculty-supervised experience in industry or business designed to bridge the gap between the classroom and a job, emphasizing use of previously acquired knowledge in dealing with practical problems for master's students.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Written permission of your practicum committee. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 8970  MASTER'S LEVEL PRACTICUM IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY (1-6 credits)

Faculty-supervised experience designed to provide experience in academic and behavioral assessment and intervention with children, and consultation with parents and school personnel.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Admission to School Psychology Graduate Program and/or permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 8980  PRACTICUM IN DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (1-6 credits)

Faculty-supervised experience in a setting designed to provide a practical understanding of theoretical concepts of human development. Emphasizes direct observation and or personal interaction as a means of training, and can be directed toward various populations within the developmental life span (e.g., infants, preschoolers, middle childhood, adolescents, adults, aged persons).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 9560 and permission of Developmental Psychology Area Committee. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 8990  THESIS (1-6 credits)

Independent research project written under supervision of a faculty committee. May be repeated up to a total of six hours.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Written permission of your thesis committee. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9010  PROSEMINAR: STATISTICAL METHODS I (3 credits)

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the statistical concepts of correlation and regression. The course will cover basic understanding of these techniques, their applications, and interpretations of results.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate standing and an undergraduate course in basic statistics which included an introduction to correlation and linear regression. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9020  PROSEMINAR: STATISTICAL METHODS II (3 credits)

An advanced approach to experimental design and inferential statistics using the analysis of variance models.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): A course in basic statistics which included an introduction to analysis of variance. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9030  SEMINAR: TOPICS IN INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (3-9 credits)

A topic area within field of Industrial Organizational Psychology will be explored in depth.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Admission to Industrial Organizational graduate program and permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9040  PROSEMINAR LEARNING (3 credits)

A comprehensive and intensive coverage of experimental literature on learning in humans and animals.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9070  PROSEMINAR: COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY (3 credits)

This course will be a comprehensive overview of the field of cognitive psychology including the topics of attention and performance, memory, problem solving, and language. In addition, there will be a more in-depth coverage of selected issues.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate standing or permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9090  THEORY OF MEASUREMENT AND DESIGN (3 credits)

Study of theoretical and practical problems related to the development and use of psychological measures and research designs covering such topics as scaling, test development, reliability, validity, interpretation of results and generalizability.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 3130 or equivalent. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9100  SMALL N RESEARCH DESIGNS (3 credits)

This course uses applications of research methodology that involve direct observation and single-subject designs to identify evidence-based practices that address clinical problems experienced by individuals across a variety of settings. Topics covered include behavioral assessment techniques, graphing data, single subject experimental designs, and consumer satisfaction with interventions.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Must be admitted to a graduate level PSYC program or permission of instructor.

PSYC 9120  MULTIVARIATE STATISTICAL ANALYSIS (3 credits)

An examination of statistical techniques for describing and analyzing multivariate data commonly collected in behavioral research. Analytic techniques derived from general linear model will be considered, focusing on proper interpretation and use. The course is intended for doctoral students in psychology and (selectively) for advanced masters students in behavioral sciences.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 9090, 9010 and 9020 or permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9130  APPLICATIONS OF ADVANCED STATISTICS IN PSYCHOLOGY (3 credits)

This course covers a variety of statistical tools that may be used to answer research questions for group designs. A primary focus of the class is the application of statistical tools to psychology research and practice.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Admission to a graduate program in Psychology. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9210  PROSEMINAR: PERCEPTION (3 credits)

A comprehensive and intensive coverage of the experimental literature on perception in humans and animals.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9230  PROSEMINAR: BEHAVIORL NEUROSCIENCE (3 credits)

A study of the biological substrates of behavior with emphasis upon neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and neuropharmacology.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9240  PROSEMINAR: EVOLUTIONARY PSYCHOLOGY (3 credits)

A comprehensive overview of behavioral biology including topics of evolution and behavior, behavioral ecology, physiology and genetics of behavior, and learning.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9290  SEMINAR IN DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOBIOLOGY (3-6 credits)

An in-depth analysis of a specific topic in psychobiology.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9320  SEMINAR IN PROGRAM EVALUATION (3 credits)

This course is intended to help advanced graduate students in the applied social sciences understand the literature and conduct evaluation research. The history of program evaluation and philosophies manifest in evaluation research are reviewed, alternative evaluation models are discussed, and relevant methodological and practical issues such as quasi-experimental design and utilization are explored.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Students should have prior graduate-level course work or experience in research design and statistics in the applied social sciences. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9421  ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY AND LEADERSHIP (3 credits)

This course is a graduate seminar on organizational psychology and leadership that focuses on the understanding and critical analysis of theory and practice pertaining to individual functioning at work. Positive organizational psychology theories and practices will provide the overarching framework in understanding potential solutions to challenges and problems facing leaders and their employees. (Cross-listed with CACT 8520)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate standing or permission of instructor.

PSYC 9430  PROSEMINAR: PERSONALITY (3 credits)

A course considering the effects of personality variables on behavior. A historical, theoretical, psychometric and experimental approach will be emphasized.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9440  PROSEMINAR: SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (3 credits)

Examination of theories, research findings and controversies in social psychology. Topics will include socialization; person perception; interpersonal attraction, leadership and group effectiveness; attitudes, attitude measurement, and attitude change; intergroup relations, power and social influence. New topics will be added as they become part of the research interests of social psychologists.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9460  SEMINAR IN AGING AND HUMAN BEHAVIOR (3 credits)

This course will examine in detail age-related changes in psychological processes and explore the implications of these changes for behavior. The course is intended for graduate students in psychology and gerontology. Students from other programs may enroll with permission of the instructor. (Cross-listed with GERO 9460)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate standing in gerontology or psychology. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9470  PRACTICUM IN APPLIED BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS (1-6 credits)

The practicum in applied behavior analysis provides students with intensive supervised experience providing behavior analytic services to improve the well-being of children and their families. Students will be assigned to practicum sites based on their respective interests, career goals, and availability of positions.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): One semester of coursework in the Applied Behavior Analysis Master's degree program or admission to the Applied Behavior Analysis Certificate program. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9500  SOCIOEMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT (3 credits)

This seminar is designed to provide an in-depth examination of the research literature on socioemotional development (emotional development that influences social behavior & development), with particular emphasis on both classic issues and current topics of debate. The course topics cover issues of importance in infancy, childhood, and adolescence. Research methods, as they apply to socioemotional development, will be emphasized throughout the course.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate standing and PSYC 9560. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9510  RESEARCH METHODS IN DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (3 credits)

This course is designed to provide graduate students in developmental psychology and school psychology with the necessary skills to enable them to frame a research question and to design a study to answer that question. In addition, students will become familiar with methodologies for specialized areas within developmental psychology. Research ethics is a major component in the course.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 9560. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9520  LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT (3 credits)

Students will explore the course of language development as well as current theoretical views attempting to explain how language is acquired. Coverage includes all aspects of language including phonology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. A portion of this course will be devoted to current computer-based methods in the analysis of child language.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 9560 or a background in linguistics or communication disorders. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9530  COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT (3 credits)

This course covers contemporary issues in theory and research concerning the development of processes by which environmental information is perceived, attended to, stored, transformed and used. Both Piagetian and information processing orientations will be emphasized.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 9560. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9540  MEMORY AND MECHANISM OF DEVELOPMENT (3 credits)

The focus of this course is on research and theory concerning transition processes in cognitive development. Topics include the role of memory in development and the mechanisms underlying children's advancing cognitive abilities. The emphasis on memory is based on the assumption that mental representations are crucial for development to take place.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 9560. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9550  PSYCHOSOCIAL DEVELOPMENT (3 credits)

A seminar focusing on research methods, theory and the empirical literature as they apply to social and personality development across the life span. All students will be expected to design and conduct a mini-observational experimental study in some specific area of social and personality development.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate standing and PSYC 9560. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9560  PROSEMINAR: DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (3 credits)

A survey of developmental processes across the life-span, with a particular emphasis on the interface of biological, cognitive and social influences. Theories of human development and issues pertaining to developmental processes are examined. The primary focus in the course is on the research literature pertaining to developmental psychology. Special emphasis is given to the role of context in development and to the topics of research methods, multicultural factors in development and social policy.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Graduate standing. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9570  APPLIED BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS (3 credits)

A comprehensive introduction to experimental methodology in applied behavior analysis. Topics covered include observational recording systems, reliability indices, procedural implementation of behavioral techniques, single-subject research designs and a broad review of the research literature.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): A minimum of one course in learning theory (PSYC 8560, PSYC 8576, PSYC 9040, or equivalent) and permission. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9580  PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT IV: ADULTHOOD (3 credits)

This course deals with intelligence, perceptual, and achievement tests and projective and objective personality methods for the psychological assessment of adults. It is intended for advanced graduate students in psychology preparing to be clinical practitioners in schools and mental health facilities.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 8520; PSYC 8530 and/or PSYC 8540; PSYC 8590 or PSYC 8446; and permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9590  SEMINAR IN DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (3-9 credits)

Faculty and student presentations organized around one of the following three major subdivisions of child psychology: (1) Social and personality development, (2) Developmental changes in memory and learning, (3) Cognitive growth and functioning. The course may be repeated each time a different topic is covered, up to a maximum total of nine credit hours.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9600  DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOPATHOLOGY: RESEARCH AND PRACTICE (3 credits)

This advanced course provides an overview of developmental factors relevant to psychopathology across the life span. Emphasis is on analysis of research, and adaption of research findings to therapeutic interventions and programs.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 4440 or 8446, 9010 or 9020, 9560; admission to program in PSYC or a related field and permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9610  INDUSTRIAL MOTIVATION & MORALE (3 credits)

A course focusing on theory and research in the areas of work motivation, work behavior and job satisfaction. Emphasis is placed on such topics as expectancy theory, job redesign, leadership, absenteeism, turnover, goal setting and behavior modification.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Admission into industrial/organizational psychology graduate program and permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9620  INDUSTRIAL TRAINING AND ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (3 credits)

This course will review theory and research relevant to training and organizational development, with emphasis on diagnosis, design, implementation, and evaluation. Practical concerns associated with intervention will be addressed.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Admission into industrial/organizational psychology graduate program and PSYC 9090, PSYC 9010, and PSYC 9020. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9630  LEADERSHIP THEORIES AND RESEARCH (3 credits)

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with a thorough review of the theories and research in the area of leadership. Theories reviewed will be those that focus on the role of the individual in effective leadership, the role of the situation, and the role of the followers. Special attention will be given to the psychological theories of leadership. The application of leadership research and theory to areas such as selection and training will also be review.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Admission into the psychology graduate program or graduate standing and instructor permission. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9640  PROBLEM SOLVING & DECISION MAKING (3 credits)

The primary objective of the course is to acquaint students with some of the major conceptual, methodological, and measurement issues within the field of problem solving and decision making. Due to the scope of this field, the course will focus on the psychological research on individual decision making, with special emphasis on the cognitive and motivational processes underlying problem solving and decision making. The second major objective of the course is to encourage students to creatively integrate and apply decision making approaches and findings to traditional areas of concern to the industrial-organizational psychologist (e.g., employee selection, performance appraisal, training, leadership, motivation). The third objective is to hone students' critical thinking skills and their ability to present their ideas in a clear and coherent manner using oral and written formats.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Must be admitted to a graduate level PSYC program or permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9650  RESEARCH METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY (3 credits)

A course designed to allow students to integrate and extend their knowledge and understanding of psychological research. Students will develop skills in writing research proposals, conducting research, and preparing manuscripts for publications.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 9010 or PSYC 9020. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9660  CRITERION DEVELOPMENT AND PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL (3 credits)

An in-depth examination of the fundamentals of personnel psychology including job analysis, criterion development and performance measurement and appraisal in organizations. Practical experience in the application of techniques and procedures is emphasized through group and individual projects in organizational settings.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Admission to industrial/organizational psychology graduate program and PSYC 9090 (may be taken concurrently). Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9670  PERSONNEL SELECTION (3 credits)

An exploration of current theory and practice in personnel selection. Problem solving strategies are emphasized through the design, analysis, and interpretation of selection research and the implementation of selection programs consistent with Equal Opportunity Guidelines and federal law.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Admission to industrial organizational psychology graduate program, PSYC 9660. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9780  ADVANCED CONSULTATION IN PSYCHOLOGY AND EDUCATION (3 credits)

The course is designed to provide education and psychology professionals a comprehensive understanding of foundational theories and processes of consultation applied to education and psychology problems of children. A major objective is to focus on developing consultation skills considered necessary to be an effective consultant through direct practice and feedback. The course will emphasize the relationship between the consultant and parents, teachers, and other professionals within the school and child mental health settings.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Admission to School Psychology Graduate Program and/or permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9790  SEMINAR IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY: ADMINISTRATION OF PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES (3 credits)

This course is designed to give the advanced student in the School Psychology Program an overview of significant professional topics in the field, particularly administration of psychological services. Ordinarily topics such as state licensing laws, state of Nebraska certification requirements, public and state laws, special education department guidelines, roles and functions and ethics will be included in the course.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Admission to School Psychology Graduate Program. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9910  TOPICAL SEMINAR IN PSYCHOLOGY (1-3 credits)

A discussion of specific advanced topics which will be announced whenever the course is offered.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9940  SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY APPLIED RESEARCH PROJECT (1-7 credits)

The applied research project consists of students conducting an independent research project from start to finish. This project should have relevance to a practical aspect of school psychology and provide a unique contribution to the field. It may be quantiative or qualitative in nature, and must rely on sound research methodology.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Must be admitted to a graduate level PSYC program or permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9950  PRACTICUM FOR DOCTORAL STUDENTS (1-6 credits)

Faculty-supervised experience in industry or business designed to bridge the gap between the classroom and a job, emphasizing use of previously acquired knowledge in dealing with practical problems for doctoral students.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Admission to industrial/organizational psychology graduate program. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9960  RESEARCH OTHER THAN THESIS (1-12 credits)

Research work under supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated up to a total of 12 credit hours.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Enrollment in a graduate program beyond the master's level. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9970  ED.S. LEVEL PRACTICUM IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY (1-6 credits)

School Psychology School-Based Practicum is a capstone course in school psychology intended for students who have completed their Master's degree in School Psychology. This course is designed to reflect the scientist-practitioner model of training and practice in School Psychology. To accomplish this goal, students will be assigned to a practicing school psychologist employed by the public schools. The content of this course will focus on integrating previous and concurrent training experiences from courses and field experiences.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Admission to School Psychology Graduate Program and/or permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9980  INTERNSHIP IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY (3-6 credits)

School Psychology Internship is the final course in school psychology intended for students who have completed all of their other coursework. It is a 1200 hour culminating experience leading to licensure/certification as a school psychologist in most states, and eligibility for the NCSP exam. The internship requires that students apply the domains of training and practice that are outlined in the School Psychology program philosophy and training objectives. University and site-based supervision is required.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Admission to School Psychology Graduate Program and/or permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 9990  PSYCHOLOGY DISSERTATION (1-24 credits)

The course provides doctoral candidates in Psychology with a process to complete a dissertation research plan. The course learning activities will focus on the completion of a candidate's dissertation. The course is designed to allow advanced doctoral candidates to demonstrate technical mastery of the discipline and to advance knowledge by completing an investigation.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Must be admitted to a graduate level PSYC program or permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.