Psychology (PSYC)

PSYC 1010  INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY I (3 credits)

An overview of scientific understanding of the human mind and behavior. Theories and empirical tests of explanations for how we think, feel, and act. This course is a prerequisite to all subsequent, more specialized courses in Psychology.

Distribution: Social Science General Education course

PSYC 1020  INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY II (3 credits)

Provides students who have completed a course in introductory psychology with an opportunity for in-depth study of selected areas of psychology along with related laboratory experiences. Research methodology is emphasized.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1010. The proposed course is designed to build upon the content knowledge gained in a first introductory psychology course.

PSYC 2000  CAREER PATHS IN PSYCHOLOGY (1 credit)

A course that introduces the student to the different career paths available to psychology majors, both within and outside of the psychology field and those including graduate or professional school as well as career paths for those with bachelor's degrees. Required of psychology majors. This is a one (1) hour credit course.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1010.

PSYC 2024  EXPLORATIONS IN THE SCIENCE OF PSYCHOLOGY (2 credits)

This course explores the scientific foundation of psychology representing several topic areas such as Learning, Developmental, Cognitive, and Physiological Psychology. Basic application of statistics and APA manuscript writing will build a solid background for upper-level courses in Psychology.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1010. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 2100  LEARNING ASSISTANT SEMINAR (0 credits)

This course focuses on effective methods of college teaching and instructional strategies. Students participate in activities designed to increase their understanding of the role of a Learning Assistant.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1010 and permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 2500  LIFESPAN PSYCHOLOGY (3 credits)

A life span approach to development focusing on the biological, cognitive, and social emotional changes in development occurring from infancy through old age. The impact of these changes on the individual's behavior and interactions with society will be emphasized.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1010.

PSYC 3130  STATISTICS FOR THE BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES (3 credits)

An introduction to statistics with particular emphasis on models and hypothesis testing covering analysis of variance, chi- square, F and t-tests, first-order regression and correlation.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MATH 1120, MATH 1530, MATH 1310 or MATH 1220. Psychology Majors Only: PSYC 2024 (prior to, or concurrent with).

PSYC 3140  RESEARCH METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY (4 credits)

An introduction to the methods by which psychologists attempt to create, disseminate and integrate knowledge about behavior. PSYC 3140 fulfills the Writing in the Discipline Requirement for Psychology and Neuroscience majors.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Psychology majors require PSYC 2000, PSYC 3130 and ENGL 1160. Neuroscience majors require PSYC 3130 and ENGL 1160

Distribution: Writing in the Discipline Single Course

PSYC 3150  SMALL-N RESEARCH METHODS (4 credits)

This course provides an introduction to small-n research methods including design, implementation, analysis, dissemination, and integration knowledge about behavior. Students also learn to use of small-n designs to identify evidence-based practices to address clinical problems experienced by individuals across a variety of settings and how to critically evaluate research in psychology. The course differs from other research methods courses (e.g., those involving qualitative methods or group designs) with its focus on objective, repeated measurement and analysis of performance at the level of the individual. This course fulfills the Writing in the Discipline Requirement for Psychology.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 3130 or Junior Status. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

Distribution: Writing in the Discipline Single Course

PSYC 3410  CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY (3 credits)

A broad survey of problems and practices in the diagnosis and treatment of emotional and behavioral disorders.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1010.

PSYC 3430  PERSONALITY AND ADJUSTMENT (3 credits)

The study of persons in a social context and their resultant effective and ineffective behavior, with emphasis on types of adjustment.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1010.

PSYC 3450  SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (3 credits)

Social interaction studied in situations of (1) social influences on individuals, (2) dyads or face-to-face groups, and (3) larger social systems. The concepts, theories, data, research methods and applications of varied substantive topics are examined. (Cross-listed with SOC 3450)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): SOC 1010 or PSYC 1010

PSYC 3510  EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (3 credits)

A study of the capacities and interests of children and their individual differences. Factors that influence learning and an evaluation of learning and classroom procedures are included.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1010.

PSYC 3520  CHILD PSYCHOLOGY (3 credits)

A study of the biological, social, emotional and cognitive development of the child emphasizing infancy and childhood.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1010.

PSYC 3540  ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY (3 credits)

A review of theory and available evidence useful in understanding changes and problems in the physical, intellectual, social and emotional adjustment of individuals in adolescence.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1010.

PSYC 3650  PHILOSOPHY OF MIND (3 credits)

A discussion of various accounts of the nature of minds which focuses upon philosophical problems such as whether the mind is identical with the brain, the extent of similarities between human minds and computers, the nature of personal identity and the relationship of mental activity to behavior. (Cross-listed with PHIL 3650, PHIL 8655).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): No Prerequisites. Some prior coursework in Philosophy is recommended but not required.

PSYC 4010  HISTORY OF PSYCHOLOGY (3 credits)

A study of the origins, development and nature of psychology and its relation to external events; emphasis on the period since 1875. (Cross-listed with PSYC 8016)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): at least 15 hours of Psychology credits including PSYC 1010 or approval of instructor. Not open to non-degree students or students in other departments or programs.

PSYC 4020  LEARNING (3 credits)

A comprehensive coverage of the experimental literature and theories on human and animal learning.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1020

PSYC 4024  LABORATORY IN PSYCHOLOGY: LEARNING (3 credits)

Classical experiments and a service-learning research project designed to apply general learning principles. Systematic techniques used to assess behavior changes associated with the learning process, research design, and scientific report writing will be emphasized.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 3140 and PSYC 4020. Not open to nondegree students.

PSYC 4030  CONCEPTUAL ANALYSIS OF BEHAVIOR (3 credits)

This course will provide students with an introduction to the theory and philosophy of behavior. Students will explore the history and foundations of behaviorism, alternative and contrasting perspectives of behavior, the shift from Behavior Modification to Behavior Analysis, the analysis of behavior within, and contemporary applications of Behavior Analysis. This course will emphasize and revisit how the theory and philosophy of behavior translate to real-world applications.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): At least 15 hours of Psychology including PSYC 1010. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 4070  COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY (3 credits)

An exploration of historical and contemporary research and theory concerned with cognitive processes including attention, memory, problem solving and concept formation.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1020.

PSYC 4074  LABORATORY IN PSYCHOLOGY: COGNITION, SENSATION AND PERCEPTION (3 credits)

Laboratory work coordinated with PSYC 4070, emphasizing a presentation of methods of research assessing human attention, memory and problem-solving processes. Research design, data analysis and research report writing are also emphasized.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 3140 and PSYC 4070 or PSYC 4090 or PSYC 4210.

PSYC 4090  COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE (3 credits)

This course is concerned with the relationship between cognition and the brain. Special attention will be devoted to the techniques used to study specific relationships and the theoretical perspectives that have guided research in the area. Topics for the course include history, neural mechanisms, methods, lateralization of function, sensation and perception, memory, language, action and movement, executive processes, computer models, and the social brain.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1020 or NEUR 1520 or NEUR 1540. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 4110  POLITICAL PSYCHOLOGY (3 credits)

This course introduces students to the role of human thought, emotion, and behavior in politics through examination of the psychological factors that motivate political elites and the mass public. (Cross-listed with PSCI 4110, PSCI 8116, PSYC 8116)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSCI 1100 or junior standing or permission of instructor.

PSYC 4150  AFRICAN AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGY (3 credits)

African American Psychology traces the psychological history of Africans and African Americans from self-attributes and identity, through race and racism, to cognition, learning, and language. This course will review concepts relevant to understanding the psychology of African Americans, methodological and research issues, and best practices. (Cross-listed with PSYC 8156, BLST 4150, BLST 8156).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1010 and Junior standing or Instructor permission

Distribution: U.S. Diversity General Education course

PSYC 4160  NEUROPHARMACOLOGY (3 credits)

Neuropharmacology will introduce students to ligand-receptor interactions and their effects on behavior, cognition, and development. This course will characterize the molecular structure of ligands and how these small molecules or biologics affect central nervous system receptors and transporters. Students will learn about structure-activity relationships and principles of pharmacology: distribution, metabolism, pharmacokinetics, and elimination) and explore the historical milestones in drug development. We'll also discuss the dynamic actions of drugs of abused drugs and the mechanisms of action. For undergraduate Neuroscience Majors, the course counts as a Neuroscience Block 1. (Cross-listed with PSYC 8166, NEUR 4160, NEUR 8166).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): NEUR 1520 or NEUR 1540 or PSYC 1020 or BIOL 1450. PSYC 4230 recommended for students who have not taken NEUR 1520 or BIOL 1450.

PSYC 4210  SENSATION AND PERCEPTION (3 credits)

Reading and discussion concerning psychophysical methods, sensory physiology, phenomenology of various sensory systems and theories of the perceptual process.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1020 or NEUR 1520 or NEUR 1540.

PSYC 4230  BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE (3 credits)

A comprehensive study of the relationship of the nervous and other organ systems to behavior. Research on both human and other animal species is considered. (Cross-listed with NEUR 4230).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1010 OR BIOL 1450

PSYC 4234  LABORATORY IN PSYCHOLOGY: BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE (3 credits)

Laboratory course designed to introduce the students to the techniques and procedures of physiological psychology. Scientific report writing, problems of research design and data analysis also will be emphasized.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 3140. Psych majors PSYC 4230; Neuroscience majors NEUR 1520 or NEUR 1540.

PSYC 4240  PHILOSOPHY OF EMOTION (3 credits)

In this class, we will aim to understand emotions, moods, attitudes, and other affective phenomena from a broad, empirically informed perspective while keeping practical issues in mind. We will ask questions such as: What are emotions, moods, and the rest? How are these various affective phenomena related to one another? How do they provide information about our relationship to the world? Under what conditions are they appropriate or inappropriate? What role do they play in our reasoning and decision-making? What role do they play in our ethical lives? What role do they play in the arts (e.g., music, literature, film)? (Cross-listed with PHIL 4240).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): No prerequisites. Some prior philosophical coursework would be useful, but it is not required.

PSYC 4250  LIMITS OF CONSCIOUSNESS (3 credits)

Consciousness is often considered one of the last great mysteries of science. Despite our internal experience of pleasures, sights, sounds, and pains, it is a largely open question why we have these experiences and what makes them happen. This upper level seminar class examines the philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience of consciousness. Topics covered will include neuroscientific theories of consciousness, unconscious perception, the relationship between attention and consciousness, animal consciousness, and detecting consciousness in the persistent vegetative state. (Cross-listed with PSYC 8256, PHIL 4250, PHIL 8256)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1010; or 6 hours in Philosophy. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 4260  MORAL PSYCHOLOGY (3 credits)

The growing interdisciplinary field of moral psychology studies our moral beliefs and decision-making processes using the tools of anthropology, psychology, philosophy, and neuroscience. Topics in the science of morality will include the moral-conventional distinction (the distinction between moral norms and non-moral norms such as etiquette), the role of reasons vs. emotions in moral judgment, the brain basis of moral decision-making, cultural differences in moral norms, psychopathy, and the development of morality in children. Psychology studies the nature of moral judgment using behavioral tasks. Neuroscience employs techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), and other tools for monitoring and manipulating brain processes to study "where" in the brain moral decision making occurs and the nature of these decisions. Throughout the course, we will examine how these empirical findings intersect with the ethical choices that we ought to make. (Cross-listed with PHIL 4260).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): No prerequisites. Some prior course work in Philosophy is recommended, but not required.

PSYC 4270  ANIMAL BEHAVIOR (3 credits)

Behavior of diverse animals for the understanding of the relationships between nervous integration and the behavior manifested by the organism, as well as the evolution and adaptive significance of behavior as a functional unit. (Cross-listed with PSYC 8276, BIOL 4270, BIOL 8276)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): BIOL 1750 and PSYC 1010 or permission of instructor, junior-senior.

PSYC 4280  ANIMAL BEHAVIOR LABORATORY (3 credits)

Laboratory and field studies of animal behavior with an ethological emphasis. Classical laboratory experiences and independent studies will be conducted. (Cross-listed with PSYC 8286, BIOL 4280, BIOL 8286)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 4270 or BIOL 4270 or PSYC 8276 or BIOL 8273. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 4310  PSYCHOLOGICAL AND EDUCATIONAL TESTING (3 credits)

The use of standardized tests in psychology and education is considered with special regard to their construction, reliability and validity. (Cross-listed with PSYC 8316)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1010 and junior/senior. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 4320  HORMONES & BEHAVIOR (3 credits)

In this course, students will examine the interaction between hormones, chemical messengers released from endocrine glands, and behavior in both human and animal systems. Methods for studying hormonal issues on behavior will be addressed. This course will provided students in psychology, biology, and related disciplines an understanding of how hormones affect sensory processing, motor activities, and processing of information in the central nervous system. (Cross-listed with PSYC 8326, BIOL 4320, BIOL 8326)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1010 and either BIOL 1020 or 1750. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 4350  BASIC/EXPERIMENTAL BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS (3 credits)

This course provides an overview of essential concepts on basic and experimental behavior analysis. Students will learn to apply a theoretical framework of behavior change concepts to socially important behaviors.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1010; PSYC 4020. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 4414  LABORATORY IN APPLIED BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS (3 credits)

Laboratory and field experience emphasizing practice and research used in behavior analysis. Emphasis will be placed on application of behavioral principles and tactics in community settings (e.g., clinic, home, school).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 3140 or PSYC 3150; PSYC 4020; PSYC 4570 or instructor approval. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 4440  ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY (3 credits)

A course designed to examine the aberrant behavior of individuals. Symptoms, dynamics, therapy and prognosis of syndromes are considered. (Cross-listed with PSYC 8446)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1010. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 4450  PERSONALITY THEORIES (3 credits)

A comparative approach to the understanding and appreciation of personality theories considering history, assertions, applications, validations and prospects. (Cross-listed with PSYC 8456)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1010. Not open to non-degree graduate students students.

PSYC 4460  PSYCHOLOGY OF ADULT DEVELOPMENT AND AGING (3 credits)

The focus of this course is on the major social and psychological changes that occur as a function of aging. Both normal and abnormal patterns of developmental change are examined, along with their implications for behavior. (Cross-listed with GERO 4460, GERO 8466).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Junior or Senior.

PSYC 4470  MENTAL HEALTH AND AGING (3 credits)

The goal of this courses is to survey the mental health needs of older adults. Consideration is given to identifying both positive mental health and pathological conditions. Treatment interventions effective with older adults and their families are also discussed. (Cross-listed with PSYC 8476, GERO 4470, GERO 8476)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Junior or Senior

PSYC 4510  PSYCHOLOGY IN THE SCHOOLS (3 credits)

This course introduces students to the academic and mental health needs of children and youth in schools, as well as how those needs are addressed individually and systemically. A service learning experience enables students to work directly with school-age children.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1010. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 4520  PSYCHOLOGY OF LANGUAGE (3 credits)

Language is what makes us human. It influences our thoughts and affects our lives in many ways. In this class, topics include the distinctive features of human language as a system of communication, the understanding and production of speech, reading and spelling, language development, bilingualism, language disorders, and how our social and cultural environment can influence how language is used. (Cross-listed with PSYC 8526)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Senior or graduate or permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 4530  CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY (3 credits)

This course will provide an overview of the cultural, community and ecological factors that play a role in how people perceive their environments. The goal is to investigate the ways in which culture affects individual behaviors, attitudes and cognitions. It may be easy to tell that two cultures are different, but identifying exactly what is meant - and all that is encompassed - when speaking about "culture" can be much more difficult. Culture can include everything from gender constructs and race/ethnicity to the effects of new technologies. All of these aspects of culture affect individuals' psychological make-up and behavior. Although psychology has largely developed from a Western tradition, attention to research from non-Western perspectives will also be emphasized. This course supports the Cultural and Global Analysis concentration in the Master of Arts in Critical and Creative Thinking. (Cross-listed with PSYC 8536, CACT 8106).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1010.

PSYC 4544  LABORATORY IN DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (3 credits)

Laboratory work coordinated with PSYC 3520 and PSYC 3540 emphasizing the methods of research and statistical analyses used in the study of human development. Emphasis will be placed on the development of skills involved in the design of experiments, data collection, data analysis, reasoning about results, and scientific report writing.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 3140, PSYC 3520, and PSYC 3540 or permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 4560  FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY (3 credits)

The roles and functions of forensic psychologists, as participants in the legal system, are studied, with special emphasis on the relevance of theories and principles from social psychology. Psychological concepts, theories, data, research methods and applications to varied substantive topics are examined (e.g., forensic careers, police psychology, violence, criminal profiling, sociopathy and psychopathy, risk assessment, expert testimony, and corrections).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1010 or SOC 1010 and PSYC 3450 or SOC 3450.

PSYC 4570  BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS AND INTERVENTIONS (3 credits)

Introduction to experimental methodology, rationale and research literature of changing behavior through behavior modification techniques. Particular attention will be paid to methodological concerns regarding single subject design, ethical considerations and ramifications of behavior intervention with children and youth. (Cross-listed with PSYC 8576)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1010, PSYC 4020 and permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 4590  PSYCHOLOGY OF EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN (3 credits)

A study of exceptional children and adolescents with sensory or motor impairments, intellectual retardations or superiorities, talented or gifted abilities, language or speech discrepancies, emotional or behavioral maladjustments, social or cultural differences, or major specific learning disabilities.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1010 and junior/senior.

PSYC 4630  ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (3 credits)

This is a survey course which will cover the major concepts, theories and empirical research related to organizational psychology. Specific topics will include: work motivation, leadership, decision making and job satisfaction as well as more recent trends such as cultural diversity, work teams, work-family and quality issues. (Cross-listed with PSYC 8636)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1010. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 4640  PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY (3 credits)

A survey of psychological principles, theories and research related to personnel issues. Course includes discussion of personnel selection, performance appraisal, recruitment, training and health and safety. (Cross-listed with PSYC 8646)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1010. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 4644  LABORATORY IN PSYCHOLOGY: SOCIAL/INDUSTRIAL-ORGANIZATIONAL (3 credits)

Laboratory work coordinated with PSYC 3450 and PSYC 4630 or PSYC 4640, emphasizing a presentation of methods of research assessing human social behavior and applied psychological processes. Research design, data analysis and research report writing are also emphasized.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 3140, PSYC 3450 and PSYC 4630 or PSYC 4640.

PSYC 4650  CREATIVITY AND INNOVATION IN ORGANIZATIONS (3 credits)

To provide a discussion of the antecedents of individual and organizational creativity, including measurement, models, characteristics of the individual and the environment that facilitate creativity and innovation in an organizational setting. Students in this course will be able to understand the research literature related to creativity and innovation and apply the findings to improve critical and creative thinking, implementation of creative ideas, and development of creative teams and organizations. This course supports the Organizational Science and Leadership concentration in the Master of Arts in Critical and Creative Thinking. (Cross-listed with PSYC 8656, CACT 8506)

PSYC 4680  POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY, HEALTH, & WELL-BEING (3 credits)

Positive psychology is the scientific study of the "good life", or the positive aspects of the human experience that make life worth living. The discipline of positive psychology focuses on both individual and societal well-being. Students will learn the tenets of positive psychology and well-being research findings, including the various definitions and operationalizations of happiness and well-being.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1010

PSYC 4800  LAW & PSYCHOLOGY: ETHICS, RESEARCH & SERVICE (3 credits)

This course presents legal principles relevant to all psychological specialties, with special reference to mental health services. Ethical reasoning and the APA ethics code are considered. (Cross-listed with PSYC 8806)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): 15 hours of Psychology credits including PSYC 1010 or approval of the instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 4810  PRACTICE AND ETHICS IN BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS (3 credits)

This course presents ethical and legal issues relevant to research and practice in behavior analysis. This class will provide undergraduate students with knowledge of ethic codes and legal statues that guide the field of applied behavior analysis and psychology more broadly. The primary emphasis will be the practical application of ethics to clinic, school, and community settings where children and adolescents are the recipients of services. Class topics related to ethics will be: principles, decision making, assessment and practice, supervision, research, responsibilities to the field of applied behavior analysis, and responsibility in public statements.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1010. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 4910  SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY (1 credit)

One credit hour Special Topics courses allow for in-depth study of psychology topics not offered in our regular curriculum. When enrolling, see notes section on course listing for specific topic. May be repeated as topics change, but six hours of Special Topics courses (PSYC 4910, PSYC 4920, and PSYC 4930) is the maximum that may be applied toward a psychology major.

PSYC 4920  SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY (2 credits)

Two credit hour Special Topics courses allow for in-depth study of psychology topics not offered in our regular curriculum. When enrolling, see notes section on course listing for specific topic. May be repeated as topics change, but six hours of Special Topics courses (PSYC 4910, PSYC 4920, and PSYC 4930) is the maximum that may be applied toward a psychology major.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Variable according to topic.

PSYC 4930  SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY (3 credits)

Three credit hour Special Topics courses allow for in-depth study of psychology topics not offered in our regular curriculum. When enrolling, see notes section on course listing for specific topic. May be repeated as topics change, but six hours of Special Topics courses (PSYC 4910, PSYC 4920, and PSYC 4930) is the maximum that may be applied toward a psychology major.

PSYC 4960  INDEPENDENT STUDY IN PSYCHOLOGY (1-6 credits)

A faculty-supervised special research project and or directed readings involving empirical research and appropriate oral and written reports arranged individually with students on topics not explored in other offerings. If students do not complete the work during the semester they enroll in the course, they must complete all the work within an academic year of their enrollment.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): A minimum of 10 hours of Psychology including PSYC 1010 & PSYC 1020 and 1 additional course. Completion of the Independent Study Form and permission from the Undergraduate Program Committee (UPC).

PSYC 4970  INTERNSHIP IN PSYCHOLOGY (3 credits)

This course provides an opportunity for practical application and further development of knowledge and skills acquired in the undergraduate psychology major. The internship will provide a practical and career-building placement in work settings. Students will develop skills and knowledge important for new steps in careers and graduate programs.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 1020; PSYC 3140; GPA requirement: 2.8; Permission of instructor, and Letter of agreement from industry mentor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

PSYC 4990  SENIOR THESIS (3-6 credits)

The course is designed to provide the student with the opportunity to initiate, design, analyze, and write-up an original experimental study in an area of interest to the student. Although the course is intended primarily for students who need to satisfy the requirement of a second experimental/laboratory course in the Bachelor of Science degree program, all students interested in this course will be considered on an individual basis.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PSYC 3140 ('B' or better), 'B' average in major; signed statement from faculty member of Psychology Department who is willing to serve as adviser; written approval from chair of undergraduate program committee. Must be a 2nd semester junior or later.