Special Education & Communication Disorders (SPED)

SPED 1110  AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I (3 credits)

This is the beginning course in a five course series teaching American Sign Language. Candidates will be introduced to use of body language/mime, basic sentence types, manual alphabet, manual numbers/number systems, basic vocabulary (n=300).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): co-requisite SPED 1114

SPED 1114  AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I LAB (1 credit)

This is the co-requisite lab course for SPED 1110, American Sign Language I. Students will complete a minimum of 10 hours in the ASL Lab interacting in a small group setting with a Deaf mentor.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Co-requisite: SPED 1110

SPED 1120  AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE II (3 credits)

This is the second course in a five course series teaching American Sign Language. Candidates will continue to develop the use of body language/mime, basic sentence types, manual alphabet, manual numbers/number systems, and intermediate vocabulary (n=300).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Co-requisite: SPED 1124; SPED 1110 and SPED 1114 with a grade of C or higher.

SPED 1124  AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE II LAB (1 credit)

This is the co-requisite lab course for SPED 1120, American Sign Language II. Students will complete a minimum of 10 hours in the ASL Lab interacting in a small group setting with a Deaf mentor.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): SPED 1110 and SPED 1114 with a grade of C or higher; Co-requisite: SPED 1120.

SPED 1400  INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATION DISORDERS (3 credits)

This course is designed to introduce the candidate to the fields of speech-language pathology, audiology, and education of the deaf/hard of hearing. The course is an overview of normal development of speech, language, and hearing, and the disorders of human communication in children and adults.

Distribution: U.S. Diversity General Education course and Social Science General Education course

SPED 1500  INTRODUCTION TO SPECIAL EDUCATION (3 credits)

This course is designed to help students explore issues and perspectives related to children, adolescents, and young adults with a variety of ability and disability experiences. It provides an introduction to the historical factors, legislation, terminology, etiology, characteristics that are commonly encountered when addressing the needs of diverse students with disabilities ranging from mild, moderate to severe.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Not open to non-degree graduate students.

Distribution: U.S. Diversity General Education course and Social Science General Education course

SPED 2100  PROFESSIONALISM & ETHICS OF INTERPRETING (3 credits)

This survey course provides an introduction to the profession and ethics of sign language interpreting. The student learns what is expected of an interpreter (roles, functions, responsibilities) and applies this knowledge to a variety of settings. Information about the history of the profession, professional organizations, and settings where interpreters work is presented. Students will be introduced to Demand/Control Schema as a foundation for assessment ethical scenarios.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Minimum 2.75 GPA and/or special permission from the instructor.

SPED 2110  AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE III (3 credits)

This is the third course in a five course series teaching American Sign Language (ASL). Candidates will continue to develop the use of body language/mime, sentence types, and advanced-intermediate vocabulary (n=300).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Minimum 2.75 GPA; SPED 1120 and SPED 1124 with a grade of C or higher; co-requisite: SPED 2114.

SPED 2114  AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE III LAB (1 credit)

This is the co-requisite lab course for SPED 2110, American Sign Language III. Students will complete a minimum of 10 hours in the ASL Lab interacting in a small group setting with a Deaf mentor.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Minimum 2.75 GPA; SPED 1120 and SPED 1124 with a grade of C or higher; co-requisite: SPED 2110.

SPED 2120  AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE IV (3 credits)

This is the fourth course in a five course series teaching American Sign Language (ASL). Candidates will continue to develop the use of body language/mime, sentence types, and advanced vocabulary (n=300).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Minimum 2.75 GPA; SPED 2110 and SPED 2114 with a grade of C or higher; co-requisite: SPED 2124.

SPED 2124  AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE IV LAB (1 credit)

This is the co-requisite lab course for SPED 2120, American Sign Language IV. Students will complete a minimum of 10 hours in the ASL Lab interacting in a small group setting with a Deaf mentor.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Co-requisite SPED 2120, minimum , cumulative 2.75 GPA, SPED 2110 and SPED 2114 with a grade of C or higher, or comparable coursework and/or demonstrated proficiency.

SPED 2200  HISTORY, PSYCHOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY OF DEAFNESS (3 credits)

This is an introductory course which surveys historical, psychological, and sociological aspects of deafness. This course introduces students to aspects of Deaf Culture and the Deaf Community. It will also examine current issues and trends and future directions in the education of children who are deaf or hard of hearing. Basic concepts, theories, research, and philosophical debates are explored through assigned readings, independent work, and classroom activities.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Minimum 2.75 GPA.

Distribution: U.S. Diversity General Education course

SPED 3000  SPECIAL STUDIES (1-3 credits)

This course is designed to allow candidates to pursue independent study of a topic under the direction and guidance of a faculty member. Topics studied and the nature of the learning activities is mutually agreed upon by the candidate and instructor.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Permission by instructor

SPED 3020  DATA COLLECTION TECHNIQUE: ROLE IN TEACHING LEARNING PROCESS (3 credits)

This is a course on formal and informal assessment for Special Education. Candidates will learn how to collect assessment data to be used for data based decision making.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): EDUC 2510 & EDUC 2520 or SPED 1500 & TED 2400; GPA = 2.75 and Co-requisite SPED 4640 & SPED 4000

SPED 3100  ENGLISH/ASL COMPARATIVE LINGUISTICS (3 credits)

This course offers a study of the fundamental concepts of linguistics and its application to the study of American Sign Language. Candidates will compare and contrasting English and American Sign Language structure. Focus will be on the fundamental areas of linguistic inquiry, which include phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and the use of language. Using current research, candiates will begin to think critically about the structure of ASL and its recognition as a language. Candidates will be expected to translate between English and signed languages to deepen understanding the study of linguistics. A video will supplement the textbook by providing examples of signs/concepts discussed in the course.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Minimum 2.75 GPA; SPED 2120 ASL IV or comparable course work, or demonstrated proficiency.

SPED 3110  AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE V (3 credits)

This is the fifth course in a series teaching American Sign Language. Focus will be on cognitive processing, fingerspelling and communicating personal experiences. Students will develop translations between English and ASL to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of both languages. This course is one of many that prepares candidates to be dedicated practitioners, reflective scholars, and responsible citizens who can meet the challenges of their profession in a changing world.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Minimum 2.75 GPA; SPED 2120 and SPED 2124 with a grade of C or higher; co-requisite: SPED 3114.

SPED 3114  AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE V LAB (1 credit)

This is the fifth lab course in a series teaching American Sign Language. The lab course will focus on aspects of receptive and expressive fingerspelling, numeral incorporation and classifiers of ASL. Students will demonstrate conversational skills incorporating ASL representative, descriptive and instrumental classifiers. Students will complete a minimum of 10 hours in the ASL Lab interacting in a small group setting with a Deaf mentor.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Minimum cumulative 2.5 GPA and SPED 2120, SPED 2124, or permission of instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

SPED 3120  ACADEMIC INTERPRETING (3 credits)

In this course candidates will focus on skills required for interpreting in a variety of academic settings. Candidates will learn to produce appropriate and equivalent interpreted messages between signed and spoken communication. Candidates will observe and analyze spoken and signed language used in the classroom and in extracurricular activities. Candidates will understand the interpreter's role as part of the educational team and how that impacts their work with students. Also included will be review and deeper exploration of communication styles, modes and language used by children.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Minimum 2.75 GPA; SPED 3110 or special permission from the instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

SPED 3130  COMMUNITY INTERPRETING (3 credits)

In this course students will learn skills in producing equivalent ASL and/or English messages in both consecutive and simultaneous interpreting. Students will interpret for adults and children moving from monologues to dialogues developing fluency, speed and accuracy. Students will continue to develop their English vocabulary, ASL vocabulary, interpreting analysis skills and strategies for team interpreting within the genres of medical and mental health, employment and vocational settings, social services, business and insurance.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): GPA 2.75 or better and SPED 3110, or special permission from the instructor.

SPED 3140  DISCOURSE ANALYSIS AND SOCIOLINGUISTICS FOR INTERPRETERS (3 credits)

During the course students will analyze language use in spoken English and American Sign Language (ASL) so that features of language use rise to the level of explicit awareness. Students collect, transcribe, and analyze various speech activities while reading and discussing theoretical notions underlying language use.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Minimum 2.75 GPA; SPED 2110 and SPED 2114 or special permission from the instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

SPED 3150  COGNITIVE PROCESSING IN ASL AND ENGLISH (3 credits)

This course presents practice of cognitive skills used in the process of interpreting. Skills include visualization, prediction, listening, memory, abstracting, closure, dual tasking, and processing time. Integration and application of these skills will lead to a self-monitoring process that will allow for self-assessment and commentaries on work performed. This course will prepare candidates as dedicated practitioners, reflective scholars, and responsible citizens who can meet the challenges of their profession in a changing world.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Minimum cumulative 2.75 GPA, and SPED 2110 and SPED 2114 or instructor permission. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

SPED 3200  WRITING FOR THE PROFESSION OF SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY (3 credits)

This course provides candidates with instruction and practice in professional and scientific writing in the area of communication disorders. The focus is on principles of composition and modes of writing suited to scientific and clinical demands. Participants will learn to adapt writing for the needs of various academic and professional audiences including the ethical implications. Professional and evidence-based writing are essential functions for dedicated practitioners, reflective scholars and responsible citizens working in school, medical, and university settings.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ENGL 1160 and SPTH or SPED major

Distribution: Writing in the Discipline Single Course

SPED 3800  DIFFERENTIATION AND INCLUSIVE PRACTICES (3 credits)

This course is designed to examine characteristics of students with various learning needs and how to apply principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) to meet their needs in an inclusive environment. This course will expand the special education content knowledge of general education teachers so they can meet the needs of all students by planning lessons using the UDL framework. The purpose of this course is for general education teacher candidates to gain content knowledge about special education policies and procedures to utilize various educational, emotional, and social accommodations necessary to provide unique and effective educational or alternative responses for students with various learning needs.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): TED 2400 or EDUC 2520; Minimum 2.75 GPA. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

SPED 4000  PRACTICUM IN SPECIAL EDUCATION (3 credits)

This practicum will examine special education methods, techniques and strategies used with children and youth with disabilities in a variety of K-12 school settings. Classroom practice and application of instructional planning and implementation, assessment techniques and behavior management will be emphasized. Collaboration and consultation models will also be included in this experience.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): EDUC 2510 & EDUC 2520 or SPED 1500 & TED 2400; GPA 2.75 or higher. Co-requisites: SPED 3020 & SPED 4640. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

SPED 4010  MENTAL HEALTH IN SCHOOLS: RISK FACTORS AND INTERVENTIONS (3 credits)

This course explores the role that educators and school mental health professionals play in identifying the risk factors and warning signs of children and youth with mental health concerns. Students will understand the risk and protective factors at the individual, family, school, and community level as related to children and youth¿s mental health. The course will provide an overview of externalizing and internalizing disorders as well as school-based and community- based treatments and interventions. (Cross-listed with COUN 4010, COUN 8016, SPED 8016).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): SPED 1500 or EDUC 2510, TED 2300, Minimum 2.75 GPA. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

SPED 4040  WORKSHOP IN SPECIAL EDUCATION OR SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY (1-6 credits)

The purpose of this course is to provide workshops or special seminars in the area of special education and communication disorders. This course will prepare graduate candidates as dedicated practitioners, reflective scholars, and responsible citizens who can meet the challenges of their profession in a changing world. (Cross-listed with SPED 8046).

SPED 4110  SIGNED ENGLISH AND OTHER SYSTEMS (3 credits)

This course examines the communication methods and modes used in educational settings with people who are deaf or hard of hearing. Candidates will gain understanding and specific skills in the Auditory-Verbal approach, Total Communication, Signing Exact English, Cued Speech, Conceptually Accurate Signed English, and Oral Transliteration. Information will be shared about the latest technology and resources available to aid communication in the classroom.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Minimum 2.75 GPA; SPED 3110 or special permission from the instructor.

SPED 4150  LITERACY ASSESSMENT AND INTERVENTIONS FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES (3 credits)

This course is designed to provide preservice teacher candidates skills and strategies for instructing students with high incidence disabilities that struggle to acquire literacy skills. Emphasis is placed on diagnosis and assessment of specific reading and writing difficulties to determine effective instructional strategies. Instructional strategies will address modifications directed at teaching oral language, reading, writing, and spelling skills.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Candidates must have successfully completed TED 2400 & SPED 1500 or EDUC 2510 & EDUC 2520. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

SPED 4180  INTERPRETING IN SPECIALIZED SETTINGS (3 credits)

This course focuses on interpreting/transliterating for special populations in a variety of specialized settings. Video relay, Deaf-Blind, Mental Health, Legal, Religious, Multi-cultural and Theatrical settings are among the specialized settings in which interpreting students will participate in additional training.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): GPA 2.75 or better and SPED 3110 or special permission from the instructor. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

SPED 4220  TEACHING SPEECH TO THE DEAF/HARD OF HEARING (3 credits)

This course will provide an investigation of the speech skills of the deaf/hard of hearing child, preschool through high school. Current theories and practices in teaching speech will be examined. This course will also present methods for assessing speech problems in deaf/hard of hearing children, making the necessary adaptations and modifications, and integrating technology.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Minimum 2.75 GPA; EDUC 2510 or SPED 1500 or permission of the instructor.

SPED 4230  LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT AND DISORDERS FOR TEACHERS (3 credits)

This course is designed to introduce the candidate to the nature and structure of language, current theories of language, normal first and second language development, language disorders, multicultural issues in language assessment, and contemporary classroom management of language deficits. The topics will be examined from an educational perspective to enhance the teachers knowledge of language and to facilitate classroom management of language deficits exhibited by exceptional children in grades pre-K through 12. (Cross-listed with SPED 8236).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Minimum 2.75 GPA; EDUC 2510 or SPED 1500.

SPED 4240  TEACHING/INTERPRETING LANGUAGE TO DEAF/HARD OF HEARING (5 credits)

This course is designed for candidates seeking to be teachers of the Deaf/Hard of Hearing or sign language interpreters. It will examine specific programs, methods, and techniques employed in fostering literacy and signacy with D/HH children from primary through secondary levels. Current theories and practices in reading and language arts instruction will be examined. This course will also present methods for assessing reading and writing, differentiating instruction, integrating technology, and collaborating with families.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): D/HH Endorsement: minimum 2.75 GPA; SPED 2110; EDUC 2510 or SPED 1500; TED 2400. Sign Language Interpreting Concentration: minimum 2.75 GPA; SPED 2110; or permission of the instructor.

SPED 4280  TEACHING AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE AS A WORLD LANGUAGE (3 credits)

This course provides a hands-on experience in the design and implementation of ASL instruction and curriculum. The course will address methods, materials, program evaluation, and teaching approaches for preparing professional instructors of ASL.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Min 2.75 GPA & proficiency in ASL. Prof shown by one of the following: complete ASL I-V courses, personal interview w/instructor, or a min level of 3 on ASL Proficiency Interview or Sign Comm Proficiency Interview. Not open to non-degree grad students.

SPED 4310  VOICE-TO-SIGN (3 credits)

This course begins consecutively interpreting monologues from the source language (English) to the target language (ASL). Students will listen to entire English monologues, process them, analyze them, and then choose appropriate ASL to match the message. The course provides instruction on refining and enhancing voice-to-sign skills, specifically simultaneously producing equivalent ASL messages from spoken English source messages. Students will learn to sign simultaneously and consecutively when viewing video or listening to audio of native English speakers from a variety of settings.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Minimum GPA 2.75 or better, and SPED 3110 or special permission from the instructor.

SPED 4320  SIGN-TO-VOICE (3 credits)

This course provides instruction on refining and enhancing sign-to-voice skills, specifically simultaneous sign-to-voice transliterating and interpreting. Students will learn to voice simultaneously and consecutively when viewing video of native signers who use a variety of signing modalities to communicate. Students will develop the ability to produce an equivalent English message from ASL source messages.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Minimum 2.75 GPA; SPED 3110 or special permission from the instructor.

SPED 4330  AURAL REHABILITATION (3 credits)

This course examines the processes and procedures in determining the aural rehabilitation needs of individuals with hearing loss (children through adult) and developing effective intervention programs.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): SPED 4370 and GPA 3.0 or higher, or permission by instructor for D/HH majors

SPED 4350  TEACHING CONTENT SUBJECTS TO DEAF/HARD OF HEARING (4 credits)

This course will describe, investigate, and put into practice instructional strategies employed in developing knowledge and concepts in social studies, science, and mathematics. The scope of the course will be preschool through high school. Curricula and materials used with K-12 students who are deaf or hard of hearing will be reviewed and evaluated.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Minimum 2.75 GPA; EDUC 2510 or SPED 1500; TED 2400 or permission of the instructor.

SPED 4370  BASIC AUDIOLOGY (3 credits)

The purpose of the course is to provide a general introduction to the study of audiology. Emphasis is on hearing disorders, hearing screening, the basic audiological assessment battery, and site-of-lesion assessment. Competency is obtained in performance of hearing and impedance screening and in interpretation of basic audiological assessment results.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Minimum 3.0 GPA and SPED 4390

SPED 4380  ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY (3 credits)

This course introduces candidates to the field of speech science. It examines the anatomy and physiology of the human communication process. The mechanisms of respiration, phonation, resonation, speech articulation, and basic neurology will be explored from the biological standpoint.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Minimum 3.0 GPA

SPED 4390  HEARING SCIENCE (3 credits)

This course is designed for undergraduate majors in speech-language pathology and audiology and for graduate candidates in education of the deaf/hard of hearing. The course will include basic terminology, anatomy and physiology of the hearing mechanism, acoustics and physics of sound, the processes of human hearing, elements of basic hearing measurements, psychophysics. This course will prepare speech-language pathology candidates as dedicated practitioners, reflective scholars, and responsible citizens who can meet the challenges of their profession in a changing world. (Cross-listed with SPED 8396).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): 2.8 GPA and SPTH major

SPED 4420  EARLY LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT IN CHILDREN (3 credits)

This course is designed to introduce the candidate to the typical development of speech and language in young children. Theories of development and the major developmental processes, which occur during the early childhood years, will be presented.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Overall GPA of 3.0. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

SPED 4430  ARTICULATION AND PHONOLOGICAL DISORDERS (3 credits)

The purpose of the course is to introduce candidates to the study of the disorders of articulation and of phonological processes. The course will include the study of normal phonological development and normal acquisition of speech sounds in addition to the study of phonological simplification processes and disordered articulatory patterns.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Minimum 3.00 GPA; SPED 4450. This course is designed for undergraduate candidates majoring in speech-language pathology.

SPED 4450  PHONETICS (3 credits)

The course covers basic theories of phonetics and experience in the application and use of the IPA. It also addresses the use of phonetics in the assessment process. Candidates learn about one aspect of their career that will lead to their becoming dedicated professionals, reflective scholars, and responsible citizens.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): SPTH major

SPED 4460  LATER LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT IN CHILDREN (3 credits)

This course is designed to introduce the student to the normal development of speech and language in children beyond five years of age. Theories of development and the major developmental processes which occur during school age and adolescent years will be presented. The relationship of language to academic performance and learning processes will be included.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Admission to the Pre-Professional Speech-Language Pathology program and SPED 4420

SPED 4470  NEUROPHYSIOLOGY OF SPEECH AND LANGUAGE (3 credits)

The purpose of this course is to provide speech-language pathology undergraduate students an introduction to human neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of the speech, language and hearing mechanisms, across the lifespan. Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of the neurophysiological underpinnings of human communication and its disorders.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Undergraduate standing, speech-language pathology majors only, and SPED 4380 or equivalency. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

SPED 4480  RESEARCH METHODS IN COMMUNICATION DISORDERS (3 credits)

This course will provide candidates with an introductory set of skills to interpret and evaluate research in communication disorders and closely related fields. In addition, this course will provide candidates with basic knowledge regarding research designs and analyses commonly used in communication disorders and related fields. The content addressed in this course will prepare candidates to judiciously evaluate evidence-based practice and apply the scientific method to clinical decision-making. It offers an opportunity to cultivate critical thinking skills imperative to becoming dedicated practitioners, reflective scholars, and responsible citizens who can adeptly meet the ever-evolving challenges of their profession. (Cross-listed with SPED 8486).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): This course is designed for graduate and undergraduate students majoring in speech-language pathology and is a required course for speech-language pathology candidates.

SPED 4490  INTRODUCTION TO PROFESSIONAL PRACTICES (3 credits)

This course is designed to precede the candidates' first practicum experiences. Candidates will learn about issues affecting their roles and responsibilities as speech-language pathologists. Information about state and national certification, licensure and professional organizations, professional ethics, philosophical bases and professional practice patterns regarding the assessment process in speech-language pathology, and counseling parents in prevention of speech/language disorders is central to the course. Candidates will develop an understanding of how cultural/ethnic diversity affects the assessment process and learn how to identify speech/language differences vs. disorders.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): SPED 3200. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

SPED 4500  PRINCIPLES OF ASSESSMENT AND INTERVENTION (3 credits)

The purpose of the course is to examine the various aspects of the profession of speech-language pathology as related to scope of practice, prescriptive methodology, models of assessment and service delivery and the selection and use of clinically-oriented technology and materials. Accountability (documentation, data collection, report writing, and service plans), multi/inter-disciplinary team membership, case selection and referral processes will also be examined. This course will provide the students with the knowledge and skills to implement appropriate assessment procedures and create an effective learning environment for each individual client.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): SPED 4490

SPED 4510  BASIC CLINICAL PRACTICUM IN SPEECH PATHOLOGY (3 credits)

This course is the entry level clinical course for undergraduate candidates majoring in Speech-Language Pathology. Candidates are offered their first opportunity to apply theoretical knowledge in a hands-on clinical experience under the direct supervision of licensed and certified speech-language pathologists.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): SPED 4490, overall 3.0 GPA in major, Senior standing, Speech-Language Pathology major, Permission from program faculty. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

SPED 4550  SPECIAL NEEDS STUDENTS FROM DIVERSE COMMUNITIES (3 credits)

The purpose of this course is to study the impact of cultural and linguistic diversity on communication, learning, and behavior. The contrast between what is considered normal language / learning development and in the presence of culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) P-12 students will receive special emphasis. (Cross-listed with SPED 8556).

SPED 4640  METHODS AND MATERIALS IN SPECIAL EDUCATION (3 credits)

This course is designed to describe the various instructional methods that have been used successfully in supporting students with disabilities in a variety of settings. This course is also intended to provide pre-service and in-service candidates with knowledge and many evidence-based teaching strategies essential for modifying the learning environment and individualizing instruction for students with disabilities. In addition, teaching methods will focus on academic curriculum lesson planning, development of IEPs, selection of instructional methods and materials, and universal design for learning (UDL).(Cross-listed with SPED 8646).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): SPED 1500 & TED 2400 or EDUC 2510 & EDUC 2520; GPA of 2.75 or better; Co-requisite course SPED 3020 & SPED 4000 Not open to non-degree graduate students.

SPED 4650  TRANSITION PLANNING (3 credits)

Curriculum oriented for teachers and related professionals to work with the career development and transition of individuals with disabilities within a multicultural and global society. Includes information for elementary through adulthood with emphasis on transition from high school to community living. (Cross-listed with COUN 8656 and SPED 8656)

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): EDUC 2510 or SPED 1500. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

SPED 4700  CLINICAL PRACTICE IN SPECIAL EDUCATION (6 credits)

This course provides candidates with experience teaching students with exceptionalities. Observation, participation, and actual teaching in an individually selected placement will be a part of the candidate's involvement in this course. This course is intended for candidates who are completing a dual endorsement program (special education and another endorsement).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): GPA minimum of 2.75 and completion of all required coursework in special education. Co-Requisite: TED 4650. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

SPED 4710  INTERACTIONS AND COLLABORATION (3 credits)

This course is offered to investigate the building blocks of collaboration. Effective interpersonal communication and collaboration skills are presented as the foundation necessary to build relationships among school personnel, families and community members. (Cross-listed with SPED 8716).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): SPED 1500 or EDUC 2510, EDUC 2520 or TED 2400, Minimum 2.75 GPA.

SPED 4720  CLINICAL PRACTICE IN SPECIAL EDUCATION (12 credits)

This course provides candidates with a practical experience teaching students with disabilities. Observation, participation, and actual teaching in an individually selected placement will be a part of the candidate's involvement in this course.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): GPA minimum of 2.75, Completion of all required course work in special education.

SPED 4724  SPECIAL EDUCATION CLINICAL TEACHING ORIENTATION (0 credits)

This course is the special education clinical teaching orientation that is paired with the Clinical Teaching in Special Education course.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): GPA = 2.75 or better, Completion of all required course work in special education. Co-requisite SPED 4720 or SPED 4730

SPED 4730  ADVANCED CLINICAL PRACTICE IN SPECIAL EDUCATION (3 credits)

A second semester of special education clinical practice experience in a placement working with exceptional children. Observation, participation and actual teaching will be part of the candidate's experience.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): GPA minimum of 2.75; SPED 4720 and permission

SPED 4740  EDUCATIONAL INTERPRETING PRACTICUM AND SEMINAR (6 credits)

The practicum candidate will work with a mentor to begin developing professional relationships while developing the ability to interpret simultaneously signed and spoken messages. Candidates will also share experiences in seminars with an instructor where discussion will focus on linguistic issues in interpretation, ethical dilemmas, and situational concerns.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): GPA minimum of 2.75, Completion of SPED 3120, SPED 3130, SPED 4180, and SPED 4240

SPED 4750  INTRODUCTION TO CHILDHOOD LANGUAGE DISORDERS (3 credits)

This course is designed to introduce the candidate to the theory and clinical practices related to assessment and management of language disorders in children and adolescents. It will cover specific strategies for identifying language disorders and evidence-based approaches to the management of language disorders, including data collection strategies and methods of evaluating efficacy of intervention.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): SPED 4420 and SPED 4460. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

SPED 4760  COMMUNITY INTERPRETING PRACTICUM AND SEMINAR (6 credits)

The practicum candidate will work with a mentor in various community settings to begin developing professional relationships while developing the ability to interpret simultaneously signed and spoken messages. Candidates will also share experiences in seminars with an instructor where discussion will focus on linguistic issues in interpretation, ethical dilemmas, and situational concerns.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): GPA minimum of 2.75, Completion of SPED 3120, SPED 3130, SPED 4180, and SPED 4240. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

SPED 4800  SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF CHILDREN AND YOUTH (3 credits)

This course is designed to prepare teacher candidates and graduate candidates with the understanding of the psychological, biological and environmental factors that affect the social-emotional development of children and adolescents. Emphasis is placed on the interaction of these factors for children with exceptional learning needs and the implications for the learning environment. (Cross-listed with SPED 8806).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): SPED 1500 or EDUC 2510, TED 2300, Minimum 2.75 GPA

SPED 4810  BEHAVIOR INTERVENTIONS AND SUPPORTS (3 credits)

This course introduces a variety of practical interventions that teachers may use to support the positive classroom behavior of all students within a tiered model. Universal, targeted, and individualized strategies are presented. (Cross-listed with SPED 8816).

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): SPED 1500 or EDUC 2510, TED 2400, Minimum 2.75 GPA

SPED 4820  EARLY CHILDHOOD INCLUSIVE EDUCATION SYSTEMS, POLICY, AND ADVOCACY (1 credit)

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the history and perspectives of key developmental theories, laws, and policies related to inclusive early childhood education. Particular attention will be paid to culturally responsive approaches to ECIE, local, state, federal, and global policy, professional roles, ethics, and advocacy. Emphasis is on current research, theory, and evidence-based practice.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): TED 2250. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

SPED 4830  ASSESSMENT IN EARLY CHILDHOOD INCLUSIVE EDUCATION (3 credits)

This course is designed to help students develop skills for effective and culturally responsive assessment and evaluation of infants, toddlers, and young children. Such assessment is vital for understanding developmental needs of young children, planning appropriate curriculum and interventions, identifying children's special needs, evaluating early childhood programs, and providing accountability information to funders and stakeholders.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Admission to Educator Preparation program, TED 2250. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

SPED 4850  HEALTH AND WELL-BEING OF INFANTS AND TODDLERS (3 credits)

This course is designed to help students gain knowledge and skills that will enable them to promote the healthy development of infants and young children. There will be an emphasis on effective and culturally responsive collaboration with families and caregivers.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Admission to the Educator Preparation program and TED 2250. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

SPED 4860  RESPONSIVE AND REFLECTIVE TEACHING IN EARLY CHILDHOOD (3 credits)

This course will prepare early childhood inclusive education majors to plan and deliver supports to a diverse array of young children (birth to age 8) and their families. Candidates will be trained in evidence-based practices used for promoting language, problem-solving, motor skills, adaptive behavior, play, and social/emotional growth in young children. There is an emphasis on anti-bias approaches to education, as well as educators' reflections upon their practices.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Admission to the Educator Preparation program, TED 2250. Not open to non-degree graduate students.

SPED 4870  PRACTICUM WITH INFANTS AND TODDLERS (3 credits)

This advanced practicum is a guided experience for candidates pursuing an emphasis in the area of Early Childhood Inclusive Education (ECIE) birth through age 3. Candidates will be required to demonstrate competencies related to promoting the development of infants and toddlers, and the skills and confidence of their families/caregivers. This is the last practicum course prior to the clinical practice semester.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Completion of ECIE undergraduate courses: TED 2250, TED 2350, SPED 4230, TED 4250, SPED 4830, SPED 4860; GPA 2.75 or higher. Co-requisites: TED 4210 and SPED 4850. Not open to non-degree graduate students.